My Favorite Book Is...

My Favorite Book Is...
Barbara Bush: Education, Arts, Letters and Ideas

Skill: Elementary School
Time Required: One to two class periods


Standards Compliance
NCSS Strand 1
Culture
NCSS Strand 4
Individual Development and Identity
NCSS Strand 7
Production, Distribution, and Consumption
NCTE Standard 1
Students read fiction, nonfiction, classic, and contemporary works to acquire information for various purposes.
NCTE Standard 3
Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts.

Introduction:

One area of genuine interest for First Lady Barbara Bush was reading, with particular emphasis on family literacy.  Her interest was, perhaps, one result of her son Neil’s dyslexia.

Objectives:

The purpose of this lesson is to allow students an opportunity to share their favorite book with their classmates.    

Materials Required:

Art supplies.  Books from home or library. Access to the Internet (for researching authors).

Procedures:

Lead students in a discussion of what characteristics make a book a “favorite” one for students their age.  Ask students what their favorite books are.  As nearly as possible, make sure that each student has a copy of his or her favorite book—from home or from a library.

 Tell students that now they work for a new publishing company, The Schoolhouse Publishers.  The new company wants new materials to advertise their favorite book.  It is their job to create these materials.  Specifically, the company wants a “blurb” about the author that is written for students their age, a new cover, and a very short summary of the book.  It is their job to create it.

Extending the Lesson:

The teacher may wish to invite the school librarian/information specialist in (or take the class to the media center/library) for a presentation on the book publishing industry.  This lesson could also be tied in with a visit in the district by a recognized children’s author or with National Library Month. This lesson can also be a group project, rather than an individual one.

Sources & Resources:

Websites:

Students may use the Web to research material on the authors of their books if it is available.

Books:
 
A book for each student or small group of students. 


Credits:
 
This lesson was developed by Bette Brooks, Kent State University.