Manuscripts for: Eleanor Roosevelt

Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library , Hyde Part, New York:

All the following entries are copied from the finding aid to Eleanor Roosevelt's Papers at the FDR Library.

Finding Aid to Part I of Eleanor Roosevelt's Papers, 1884-1964, Accession Numbers: 63-1, 73-40. The unpublished writings of Anna Eleanor Roosevelt are in the public domain.

Quantity: 1095 feet (approximately 2,190,000 pages)

Restrictions: The papers contain national security information restricted in accordance with Executive Order 12356, and material which might be used to embarrass, harass or injure living persons has been closed.

Related Materials:

--President's Official File
--President's Personal File
--President's Secretary's File
--Eleanor Roosevelt Oral History Project
--Papers of Anna Roosevelt Halsted
--Papers of Lorena Hickok
--Roosevelt Family Papers Donated by the Children of Franklin D. and Eleanor Roosevelt
--Papers of Marion Dickerman
--Papers of Joseph P. Lash
--Papers of James Roosevelt

Note: These "White House" papers, 490 cubic feet, concern Mrs. Roosevelt's public and private life in Washington as the wife of the president of the United States. The correspondence begins in 1934--except for fragmentary 1933 material in File 100. Apparently Mrs. Roosevelt destroyed her 1933 files. (See note in Accession Record 43-199). The papers are arranged numerically by file number and thereunder chronologically and thereunder alphabetically by correspondent. A listing of major files precedes the inventory.

Description of Series 1:

--Early Family Papers

. 1860-1910 and Undated. 1 Container. Contains letters, writings, and diaries of Eleanor Roosevelt's parents, Anna Rebecca Hall and Elliott Roosevelt, her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. V.G. Hall, Jr., cousin Susan Parish, aunt Edith "Pussie" Hall (Mrs. William Forbes Morgan). Correspondents include Anna "Bamie" or "Bye" Roosevelt Cowles and Corinne Roosevelt Robinson, sisters of Elliott Roosevelt; Ella Bulloch and Laura Delano, aunts of Elliott Roosevelt; Elizabeth "Tissie" Hall Mortimer, sister of Anna Hall Roosevelt; W.C.P. Rhodes, clergyman and friend of the Hall family; also, some loose flyleaves from Roosevelt family books.

--Family and Personal Correspondence. 1894-1957 and Undated. 2 Containers. Arranged alphabetically and thereunder chronologically. Includes messages of congratulations to Eleanor and Franklin of their engagement and the birth of their son James in 1906; condolence letters to Eleanor and Franklin after FD's polio attack; invitations to White House affairs, 1905-1916; letters from Madame Souvestre in French with English translations; letters from David and Maude Hall Gray, Eleanor Roosevelt's aunt and uncle, written during the period when David Gray was U.S. Minister to Ireland; Edward Ludlow Hall, uncle of Eleanor Roosevelt; poetry collected by Eleanor Roosevelt; a letter sheet from the"Prinzessin Victoria Luise," the ship on which Franklin and his mother cruised in 1904; letters from the Roosevelt children, including Elliott, Franklin Jr. and James' wife, Betsy Cushing Roosevelt; messages pertaining to household management and business matters; a plan for world peace written in 1923 by FDR; and Columbia School of Law examination results.
Correspondents include Eleanor Blodgett, Mrs. William Jennings Bryan, Carrie Chapman Catt, Franklin Caulder, James M. Cox, Sara, Warren, Dora and Franklin Delano, Susie Hall, Edith Helm, Harry Hooker, Lou Henry Hoover, Esther Lape, Alice Roosevelt Longworth, Carola Passavant, Endicott Peabody, Caroline Phillips, Edmund Rogers, G. Hall Roosevelt, Edith and Theodore Roosevelt, Signorina Samaia, Alfred E. Smith, Claude Swanson, Florence Willert and Owen D. Young.

--School Exercise Books and Notebooks. ca. 1892-1902. 1 Container. Early composition books from classes taught by Frederic Roser; notebooks for English, French, and Italian literature from Allenswood in England; a music practice card and report cards. The report cards are in French and include notations by Marie Souvestre, headmistress of the school.
--Diaries, Address and Dinner Books. 1902-1932 and Undated. 1 Container. Diary entries for 1910, 1919, and 1921 are brief and prosaic and refer chiefly to the weather, errands, dinners, visitors, etc. The dinner books merely record luncheons and dinners given by ER and FDR. Guest lists and seating arrangements are included.
--Invitations. 1929-1932. 3 Containers. Arranged by year for the period 1929-1930 and 1931-1933. These boxes contain cards of invitation addressed to ER to attend club meetings, weddings, charity affairs, dances, balls, musicals, luncheons, dinners, committee meetings, political affairs, etc. On the invitation, there usually appears a pencilled notation: "regrets" or "OK."
--Prohibition Correspondence. January - February 1933. 3 Containers. Letters sent and received. Arranged pro and anti ER's radio message concerning prohibition and thereunder alphabetically.
--Miscellaneous Clippings. 1929-1932. 1 Container. Unarranged newspaper and magazine clippings re: ER.
--Membership. 1934-1945. 16 Containers. Correspondence, memoranda, telegrams, newspaper clippings, pamphlets and other printed material. Arranged chronologically and thereunder in rough alphabetical order by name of correspondent or organization. These papers concern Mrs. Roosevelt's activities in public service organizations. They also include invitations to membership, acceptances, declinations, resignations and related correspondence, usually descriptive material pertaining to the work of the organization.
Among the organizations represented are: American Emergency Campaign of the British Relief Society, American Federation of Radio Artists, American Friends Service Committee, American Red Cross, Children's Aid Society, China Emergency Relief Committee, Daughters of the American Revolution, Girl Scouts, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, National Institute of Social Sciences, Newspaper Guild of New York, New York State Grange and the Society of American Arts and Letters.
Replies were prepared and signed either by Malvina Thompson, secretary to Mrs. Roosevelt, or by the Administrative Officer of Social Correspondence in the White House. Many incoming letters include marginal notes in Mrs. Roosevelt's hand indicating the reply. The papers are organized into three parts: 10.1 Memberships: Accepted; 10.2-Memberships: Declined; 10.9-Memberships: Miscellaneous.
--Patroness. 1934-1945. 25 Containers. Correspondence, memoranda, newspaper clippings, poetry, sheet music, books, pamphlets and other printed materials. Arranged chronologically and thereunder in rough alphabetical order.
Contains correspondence from individuals and organizations inviting Mrs. Roosevelt to act as a patroness or asking permission to use her name in behalf of various civic, cultural and philanthropic enterprises. Also includes invitations to serve as contest judge and letters from individuals wishing to dedicate poems, books, musical compositions to her. Mrs. Roosevelt often agreed to serve as patroness or lend her name to those organizations dedicated to civic and cultural betterment, general welfare and war relief.
This file is divided into six parts: 20.1-Patroness: Accepted; 20.2-Patroness-Declined; 20.3-Patroness: Articles, etc. named for ER; 20.4-Patroness: Books, songs, etc. dedicated to ER; 20.5-Patroness: Judge of contests, etc.; 20.9-Patroness: Miscellaneous. Replies were drafted and signed by Malvina Thompson or the Administrative Officer of Social Correspondence. Mrs. Roosevelt's pencilled notations, outlining the reply appear on a number of incoming letters.
--Invitations. 1933-1945. 238 Containers. Correspondence, memoranda, telegrams, speech drafts, notices, lists, itineraries, newspaper clippings, pamphlets and other printed materials. Arranged chronologically and thereunder in rough alphabetical order by name of correspondent.
This file contains information on Mrs. Roosevelt's wide-ranging activities and travels including: radio broadcasts, commencement addresses, dedications, presentations, appearances, and speeches before public and private organizations, lecture tours, visits to housing projects, co-op colonies, schools, hospitals and military installations. Also invitations to speak to or appear before various gatherings, acceptances, declinations and related correspondence, usually descriptive material pertaining to the work of the organization.
The series is divided into four parts: 30.1-Invitations: accepted; 30.2-Invitations: Declined; 30.3-Birth and Wedding Announcements; 30.9-Invitations: Miscellaneous. Replies were prepared and signed by Malvina Thompson or Ralph W. Magee, Administrative Officer of Social Correspondence. Brief notes written by Mrs. Roosevelt appear in the margin of many incoming letters.
Among the organizations represented in this file are: Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth, American Friends of German Freedom, American Youth Congress, British War Relief, Bundles for Britain, Camp Fire Girls, Committee for Refugee Educations, Council of Young Southerners, Girl Scouts, International Student Service, Liberal Party of New York, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, National Association of the YMCA, National Public Housing Conference, National Urban League, National Youth Administration, Office of Civilian Defense, Red Cross, Rural Urban Women's Conference, United China Relief, United Nations.
--Messages Requested. 1934-1945. 57 Containers. Correspondence, memoranda, press releases, radio broadcast transcriptions, newspaper and periodical clippings and statement and message drafts. Arranged chronologically and thereunder in rough alphabetical order by name of correspondent or organization.
The papers in this file include messages, statements, editorials and greetings prepared by or for Mrs. Roosevelt for defense workers, military servicemen, schools, hospitals, religious bodies, relief and philanthropic organizations, magazines and newspapers. Also messages and statements to be read before political rallies, war bond drives, social and fraternal gatherings and labor and educational conventions. Prepared statements for inclusion in periodicals and newspapers published in Australia, Great Britain, Iceland and Russia, done at the request of the Office of War Information during World War II, are also found herein. Includes personal messages and congratulations to individuals, requests to review books, write forwards and editorials. There is also correspondence concerning material written by "ghosts" and published under Mrs. Roosevelt's name. The file contains a good deal of information on Mrs. Roosevelt's background, activities, daily routine and views on contemporary matters as well as requests for interviews, information concerning the history, furnishings and routine of the White House and appeals for personal letters.
This series is divided into six parts: 40.1-Messages sent by Mrs. Roosevelt; 40.2-Messages Refused; 40.3-Requests for Information about the White House; 40.4-Requests for Interviews; 40.5-Requests for Personal Letters from ER; 40.9-Miscellaneous messages Requested from ER.
Among the organizations listed are: American Friends Service Committee, American Newspaper Guild, American Society for the Control of Cancer, American Youth League, Camp Fire girls, California Federation of Women's Clubs, Child Study Association of America, China Relief, Civilian Conservation Corps, Common Council for American Unity, Council Against Intolerance in America, Daughters of the American Revolution, Federal Arts Project, Girl Scouts, National Conference of Christians and Jews, National Education Association, National Maternal and Child Welfare Conference, National War Fund, No-Sectarian Foundation for Refugee Children, Office of Civilian Defense, Office of War Information, Russian War Relief, United Office and Professional Workers of America, United States Travel Bureau, Women's Field Army, Women's Institute, and World Student Service Fund.
--Gifts. 1934-145. 211 Containers. Correspondence and memoranda arranged chronologically and thereunder in rough alphabetical order by name of correspondent and organization. Contains letters of acknowledgement to individuals and organizations sending gifts to Mrs. Roosevelt.
The series is organized into eight sections: 50.1-Gifts: Food; 50.2-Gifts: Books; 50.2.1-Gifts: Songs, Poems, etc.; 50.2.2-Gifts: Pictures; 50.3-Gifts: Flowers; 50.4-Gifts: Returned; 50.5-Christmas Gift Acknowledgements; 50.9-Gifts: Miscellaneous. --Business and Commercial Matters. 1934-1945. 27 Containers. Correspondence, memoranda, invoices, telegrams, statements and other business papers. Arranged chronologically and thereunder in rough alphabetical order by name of correspondent or organization.
These papers relate to the management of the Roosevelt residences in New York City, Hyde Park, and Campobello, New Brunswick. Also, correspondence with business firms regarding the purchase of food, gifts, reading matter, clothing and household items. Includes letters soliciting Mrs. Roosevelt's name to promote the sale of various commercial products. Other material concerns purchases made from the Val Kill Furniture Shop, Hyde Park, the woodcraft shop at the Arthurdale, West Virginia resettlement project and various WPA handcraft projects.
The series is divided into four parts: 60.1-Purchases made by Mrs. Roosevelt; 60.2-Use of Mrs. Roosevelt's Name in Advertising; 60.3-Mrs. Roosevelt's Personal Preferences; 60.9-Miscellaneous Business Matters.
--Correspondence with Government Departments. 1934-1945. 350-Containers. Correspondence, telegrams, memoranda, letters of transmittal, cross reference sheets, notes, reports and newspaper and periodical clippings. Arranged chronologically and thereunder in rough alphabetical order by name of correspondent.
This file consists largely of correspondence from the general public in which tens of thousands of citizens sought Mrs. Roosevelt's assistance, intercession or advice. The files of the 1930's reflect the plight of many desperate persons hit by the depression: farmers whose properties were being foreclosed, veterans seeking bonuses, medical help or hospitalization, unemployed appealing for jobs, funds or medical care, families in legal, social or financial difficulties of every description.
The files after 1940 reflect general improvement of business conditions and the correspondence begins to deal with aspects of selective service, conditions in military camps and complaints about treatment of draftees. As the war advanced, the correspondence reflects pressures of wartime, appeals from parents for release of their sons from the armed forces, complaints about gas rationing, price control, race riots and shortages of goods and services.
Incoming letters, whenever possible, were referred to appropriate government departments for action, otherwise the reply was drafted by members of Mrs. Roosevelt's staff, usually Malvina Thompson or Mrs. James Helm. Mrs. Roosevelt replied to relatively few letters but she did carry on an extensive correspondence with departmental heads and federal officials, including all members of the Cabinet about matters brought to her attention by the public.
The file as a whole documents Mrs. Roosevelt's interest and involvement in civil rights, public housing, problems of youth and minority groups, social and economic rehabilitation, politics and education. Among those persons who had an extensive correspondence with Mrs. Roosevelt are the following: W.W. Alexander (Resettlement), Sanford Bates (Bureaus of Prisons), A.A. Berle (State), Francis Biddle (Attorney General), Chester Bowles (OPA), Wilson Brown (Navey), Edward Bruce (Fine Arts, WA), John Carmody (Federal Works), John Collier (Indian Bureau), Jonathan Daniels (White House), Elmer Davis (OWI), John Fahey (Home Owners Loan Corp.), James Farley (Postmaster General), Robert Fechner (CCC), Hallie Flanagan (Theatre Project, WPA), Leon Henderson (OPA), Lewis Hershey (Selective Service), Frank T. Hines, (VA), Oveta C. Hobby (WAC), Cordell Hull (State), Florence Kerr (WPA), Katharine Lenroot (Labor), Herbert Lehman (UNRRA), Frank McCarthy (Army), Archibald MacLeish (Library of Congress), Lucille McMiller (Civil Service), Paul V. McNutt (War Manpower), Henry Morgethau (Treasury), Basil O'Connor (Red Cross), Frederick Osborn (Army), Thomas Parran (Surgeon General), Frances Perkins (Labor), Clarence Pickett (American Friends), Nelson Rockefeller (Inter-American Affairs), James Rowe (White House), Robert Sherwood (OWI), Hilda Smith (WPA), Edward Stettinius (State), Henry Stimson (War), Nathan Straus (Housing Authority), John W. Studebaker (Education), Rexford G. Tugwell (Resettlement), J.O. Waler (Resettlement), Henry Wallace (Agriculture), E.M. Watson (White House), Sumner Welles (State), Claude Wickard (Agriculture), Aubrey Williams (NYA), M.L. Wilson (Interior), Ellen Woodward (WPA).
--Office of Civil Defense. 1942. 13 Containers. Correspondence, memoranda, speech drafts, lists and various printed and mimeographed materials. Correspondence is arranged in rough alphabetical order; most of the material is dated between January and March 1942.
This file concerns Mrs. Roosevelt's work with the Office of Civilian Defense during the early part of 1942 when she served as associate director. It contains offers of help and suggestions on what the agency should do; and letters protesting the appointment of Melvyn Douglas, the motion picture actor and Maryris Chaney, a professional dancer. These protests resulted in restrictions being placed by the Congress on OCD appropriation bill and the resignation of Mrs. Roosevelt as associate director on February 20, 1942. There is material concerning OCD administration, plans and programs for meetings and speeches, proposals for food saving campaigns, evacuation of civilians, civilian morale and the problem of Negro participation.
The series is divided into four parts: 71-0.C.C.: General; 71.1-O.C.D.: Miscellaneous; 71.4-O.C.D.: Suggestions; 71.9-O.C.D.: Women's Activities. Mrs. Roosevelt replied to a few letters but most of the outgoing correspondence was prepared and signed by Mrs. J.M. Helm. None of the approximately 1,000 letters protesting the Douglas-Chaney appointments was answered.
--Old Age Pensions. 1935-1945. 11 Containers. Correspondence, memoranda and related printed materials. arranged chronologically and thereunder in rough alphabetical order by name of correspondent or organization.
The material in this file pertains to public interest in government old age pension planning, particularly in Townsend plan. There are letters urging Mrs Roosevelt to support various pension schemes; correspondence criticizing the administration of local and state relief; and letters detailing the conditions in country and municipal poor houses. Most correspondents are among the aged and impoverished and their letters reveal a desperate need for assistance.
Replies were by form letter signed by Malvina Thompson to the effect that Mrs. Roosevelt was in favor of some form of old age pension plan to be administered by the federal government.
--Social Events at the White House. 1933-1945. 21 Containers. Correspondence, memoranda, cross reference sheets, guest lists, menus, entertainment programs and other printed materials. Arranged chronologically for period 1933-1940; for the years 1941-1945 arranged chronologically and thereunder in rough alphabetical order by name of correspondent or organization.
This file contains requests for invitations to luncheons, teas, receptions and other White House social functions. Also offers from artists wishing to perform at White House. Exchanges between Mrs. Roosevelt's staff and Mr. Henry Jurge of Steinway and Sons, New York, the firm charged with arranging White House musical programs are found herein. Also correspondence relating to the 1939 visit of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth with requests for autographs and photographs of the royal couple. Also offers to "help out" during the royal visit and requests for invitations to the various functions planned for the King and Queen.
The series is divided into five sections: 80.1-Requests for Invitations to the White House; 80.2-Social Events at the White House; 80.3-Entertainment Arrangements; 80.4-Visit of British Royalty; 80.9-Miscellaneous Social Events at the White House.
--Congratulations and Greetings. 1933-1945. 202 Containers. Correspondence, memoranda, telegrams, newspaper and periodical clippings and various printed materials. Arranged chronologically and thereunder in rough alphabetical order. This file includes messages declaring faith and confidence in President and Mrs. Roosevelt, birthday greetings, Christmas cards and general congratulatory notes to Mrs. Roosevelt. Contains letters praising speeches, radio broadcasts and statements made by the President and Mrs. Roosevelt; as well as communications from civic organizations thanking for participation or attendance at various functions, welfare activities and invitations to visit various cities, institutions and events. Also letters suggesting Mrs. Roosevelt run for political office.
The papers are organized in two parts: 90.-Congratulations and Greetings; (The last 7 boxes of Series 90.-for 1941 contain condolences sent to Mrs. Roosevelt on the death of her brother, G. Hall Roosevelt). 90.1-Election Congratulations to Mrs. Roosevelt, 1940.
--Gifts to the Red Cross etc. 1942-1945. 2 Containers. Correspondence, memoranda and various printed materials. Arranged chronologically.
This file concerns financial contributions to charitable and philanthropic organizations chiefly the Red Cross but other groups included are: Infantile paralysis Fund, Georgia Warm Springs Foundation, National Society for Crippled Children, United States Assembly and the fund for Mrs. Henry Bacon, widow of the architect of the Lincoln Memorial. Also the Greek War Relief Association, Russian War Relief and Untied China Relief. Probably contributions for these groups were sent to Mrs. Roosevelt because of the interest she generated in these organizations through her "My Day" newspaper column.
--"My Day" comments. 1936-1945. 54 Containers. Correspondence, memoranda, periodical and newspaper clippings, pamphlets and other printed materials. Arranged chronologically and thereunder in rough alphabetical order.
This file concerns the public's reaction to statements and opinions made by Mrs. Roosevelt in her "My Day" column, a syndicated feature that appeared in approximately ninety newspapers throughout the country. This daily column, written in an informal style, began in 1936, and, according to Malvina Thompson, carried a "resume of Mrs. Roosevelt's day's activities and an occasional expression of her thought on current events." Much of the correspondence contains friendly expressions of views prompted by her discussions of personalities, events, personal and family problems.
There is correspondence discussing current affairs; letters protesting the anti-Roosevelt articles of Westbook Pegler; messages of appreciation for her defense of minority groups, individual rights and social reform; and letters relating to Mrs. Roosevelt's support or opposition to pending legislation in Congress. Also material from commercial enterprises and social service agencies requesting support for their activities.
Replies were usually prepared by Malvina Thompson although Mrs. Roosevelt did express her views on current problems to a few friends or leaders in education, suffrage, welfare and politics. A selected list includes: Douglas Chandor (painter), Carrie Chapman Catt (suffragette, lecturer), James B. Contan (scientist, government official), Amelia Earhart (aviatrix), Helen Keller (author, lecturer), David K. Niles (government official), Mary T. Norton (congresswoman), Caroline O'Day (congresswoman), Drew Pearson (columnist), Vincent Sheehan (author), Cornelia Otis Skinner (actress, authoress), Ida M. Tarbell (biographer), Dorothy Thompson (journalist), and Mary E. Wooley (college president).
--Personal Letters. 1933-1945. 547 Containers. Correspondence, memoranda, telegrams, cablegrams, reports, legislative bills, cross reference sheets, article and speech drafts, press releases, article reprints, periodical and newspaper clippings, miscellaneous printed material and enclosures. Arranged chronologically and thereunder in rough, alphabetical order by name of correspondent.
File 100 may be considered as Mrs. Roosevelt's personal file since she drafted and signed about 90% of the replies. The material reflects and documents her interest and service in such fields as labor, the youth movement, civil liberties, public welfare, education, refugee assistance, women's rights and national defense. Mrs. Roosevelt's wide range of acquaintances, coupled with her many interests, make this file indispensable to prospective biographers as well as general historians of the New Deal period.
This correspondence reflects her association with hundreds of experts and leaders in and out of government among whom were: Negro educator Mary McLeod Bethune, President Remson Bird of Occidental College, President Isaiah Bowman of Johns Hopkins, novelist Pearl Buck, suffragette Carrie Chapman Catt, Madame Chiang Kai-shek, Prime Minister Winston Churchill, Jerome Davis of the YMCA, Red Cross director Norman Davis, Congresswoman Helen Gahagan Douglas, Paul Kellogg of Survey Graphic, Mayor Fiorello La Guardia, philanthropist Mary Lasker, labor leader John L. Lewis, Ambassador Lincoln McVeagh, Congressman Maury Maverick, James G. McDonald of the President's Advisory Committee on Political Refugees, Secretary Henry Morgethau, Dillon Myer of the War Relocation Authority, Congresswoman Caroline O'Day, Secretary Frances Perkins, Walter Reuther of the UAW, social economist Mary Simkhovich of Greenwich House, welfare expert Lillian Wald and Walter White of the NAACP.
Extensive and interesting exchanges between Mrs. Roosevelt and old friends such as Lady Stella Reading, the Dowager Marchioness of Reading, Esther Lape, Molly Dewson, Rose Schneiderman, Lady Florence Willert, Helena Hirt of Great Britain, Carola von Schaffer-Bernstien of Berlin, Bernard Baruch and Josephus Daniels. Also correspondence with members of her immediate family but these "family letters," by prior agreements, are presently closed to research.
Mrs. Roosevelt always maintained friendly relations with women of the press. She encouraged them to pass on their impressions of who and what they saw here and abroad. There is useful material from Lorena Hickok on politics and relief activities across the country; correspondence from Ruby Black describing economic conditions and politics in Puerto Rico; letters from Martha Gelhorn Hemingway on the Spanish Civil War and the plight of refugees; reports from Anna Louise Strong during and after her visits to Russia and China; and material from war correspondent Doris Fleeson concerning Mrs. Roosevelt's wartime trip to Australia and the Pacific. Other reporters who communicated regularly were Bess Armstrong, Emma Bugby, May Craig, Freda Kirchwey and Mrs. William B. Meloney.

The following topical lists illustrate Mrs. Roosevelt's concern with the economic, social and political problems of the New Deal decade:
--Resettlement Administration--Arthurdale and Reedsville Projects: Bernard Baruch (1935-37), Frank T. Bell (1934), Elsie R. Clapp (1935-36), Floyd B. Cox (1936,1938), Allie S. Freed (1936-37), Bushrod Grimes (1934-37), Pat Harrison (1936), Mrs. A.L. Holland (1939), Henry Leach (1934), Lucy S. Mitchell (1936), E. Grant Nine (1936-40), Homer Rainey (1936), Donald Stephens (1936), Rexford Tugwell (1937) and Daniel Willard (1937).
--Youth Movement: Bernard Baruch (1937-44), Joseph Cadden (1938-41), James Carey (1943), Alfred Cohn (1943), Malcolm C. Dobbs (1940), Frank Graham (1943), Latham Hatcher (1938-41), William H. Hinckley (1936-40), Viola Ilma (1934-44), John A. Long (1937), Joe Lash (1936-42), Howard Lee (1939), Jack McMichael (1940-41), William E. Porter (1934-35), Trude Pratt (1943-44), Abbot Simon (1937-39), Herbert B. Swope (1940), Charles W. Tassig (1936-42), Margaret Valiant (1940), and Molly Yard (1941-43).
--Labor, Words Progress Administration: Helen Astor (1935), Bernard Baruch (1937, 1941), Edward Bruce (1934-41), James Carey (1943), Howard Cullman (1935), Molly Dewson (1934-45), James Dornbrowski (1941), Adrian Dornbush (1940-41), Mary L. Drier (1937), Hallie Flanagan (1935), William Green (1943), Lester Herzog (1936), Sidney Hillman (1938-42), Harry Hopkins (1934), Mrs. Henry G. Leach (1936), John L. Lewis (1937, 1940), David K. Niles (1937), Joseph T. Robinson (1938), Walter Reuther (1943-44), Anna Rosenberg (1943-44), Rose Schneiderman (1934-45), Hilda Smith (1943), Brehon Somerville (1936, 1940), Katherine Woodruff (1934).
--Education and Public Welfare: George E. Allen (1934-35), Newton D. Baker (1934), Bernard Baruch (1934-44), James F. Byrnes (1935), Jerome Davis (1936), Mary Dewson (1934-45), Florence Hale (1934), Harry Hopkins (1934), Fiorello LaGuardia (1940), Maury Maverick (1936-40), Bernard McFadden (1937-38), Mary Simkhovich (1935-42), Anson P. Stokes (1935-37), John W. Studebaker (1934), Rexford Tugwell (1934), Lillian Wald (1935-40).
--Public Housing: Helen Alfred (1936-37), John Carmody (1941), Frederic Delano (1934), Dorothy Draper (1934), Allie S. Freed (1936-37), Frank Hancock (1937), Harold Ickes (1934), Robert D. John (1934), Paul Kellogg (1936), Fiorello LaGuardia (1941), Stewart McDonald (1936,1938), Maury Maverick (1939-40), Mrs. Samuel Rosenman (1944), Maury K. Simkhovich (1934, 1937, 1939), Hilda Smith (1943), Charles F. Weiler (1935).
--Politics: Bess Armstrong (1938), George L. Berry (1936), Remsen Bird (1944), Molly Dewson (1934-45), Helen Gahagan Douglas (1940-41), Stephen Early (1936), James A. Farley (1934), Crystal Bird Fauset (1934), Lorena Hickok (1936-37), Nan Honeyman (1936), Louise Lazell (1936), Herbert Lehman (1936-37), Maury Maverick (1944), Mrs. William B. Meloney (1940), Mrs. Thomas F. McAllister (1937-45), Emma Guffey Miller (1937), W. Forbes Morgan (1936), Caroline O'Day (1934-42), Homer Rainey (1944), Harriet Ryan (1944), Rose Schneiderman (1935-45), Upton Sinclair (1934, 1937).
--Civil Liberties: Mary McLeod Bethune (1937-45), Jerome Davis (1943-44), Helen Gahagan Douglas (1941), C.A. Dykstra (1941, Edwin R. Embree (1943), Morris Ernst (1941), Crystal Bird Fauset (1934), T. Arnold Hill (1938), Viola Ilma (1940), Gardiner Jackson (1939), Rufus Jones (1944), Fiorello LaGuardia (1943), Mary Ladker (1942), Howard Lee (1939-41), Maury Maverick (1939-40), J.J. McCloy (1943-44), William L. Neumann (1944), Robert Patterson (1941), A. Philip Randolph (1941), Donald Stephens (1943), Anna Louise Strong (1939), Evan Thomas (1943), Walter White (1934-45), Roy Wilkins (1935).
--European Refugees: A.A. Berle (1940), Francis Biddle (1940), Jerome Davis (1941), Norman Davis (1937-40), Dorothy Canfield Fisher (1940), Marshall Field (1941), Martha Gelhorn (1937-40), Helen Hayes (1942), Sidney Hillman (1941), James W. Johnson (1944), Mrs. William B. Meloney (1940), James G. McDonald (1941), Eric Muggeridge (1940), Caroline O'Day (1940), Lady Reading (1944), Patrick F. Scanlan (1937), Abbott Simon (1940), Ingrid Warburg (1940-43).
--Civilian Defense and Domestic Matters during World War II: Bernard Baruch (1941-44), Remson Bird (1942-44), Helen Gahagan Douglas (1941), Sidney Hillman (1942-42), Paul Kellogg (1942), James Landis (1942), Mrs. William B. Meloney (1942), David K. Niles (1941), Mrs. Gifford Pinchot (1941-42), Lady Stella Reading (1940-41), Walter Reuther (1944), Mrs. W.H. Reuter (1944), Anna Rosenberg (1941).
--Children Named for Eleanor Roosevelt 1934, and Letters from Servicemen, 1942-1945. Correspondence, memoranda, newspaper and periodical clippings. Arranged chronologically and thereunder in rough alphabetical order by name of correspondent.
--This file contains correspondence on Mrs. Roosevelt's books, chiefly, This Is My Story (Harpers & Bros., 1937), an autobiographic account from childhood through 1924 first appearing in serial form in The Ladies Home Journal (April, 1937). Other books mentioned are: This Troubled World (H.C. Kinsey, 1938), My Days (Dodge, 1938), and Moral Basis of Democracy (Howell, Soskin, 1940).
Also letters from friends and contemporaries prompted to recall events, persons, and places after reading This Is My Story. Some of this provides interesting commentaries on social history of the Hudson Valley, Newport, Rhode Island, Sagamore Hill and Oyster Bay at the turn of the century.
Remaining letters include requests for Mrs. Roosevelt's autograph in books submitted to her and for copies of This Is My Story from public libraries, charitable institutions and religious groups. There are occasional memoranda from her publishers on routine business matters.
--Refugee Letters. 1940-1945. 4 Containers. Correspondence, memoranda, telegrams, cablegrams, cross reference sheets, newspaper and periodical clippings, pamphlets and other printed material. Arranged chronologically and thereunder in rough alphabetical order.
This file concerns the activities of the United States Committee for the Care of European Children, Inc., an agency organized on the initiative and under sponsorship of Mrs. Roosevelt. She was named honorary chairman while Marshall Field, Chicago businessman and philanthropist served as chairman.
Approximately 70% of incoming letters were requests for information concerning requirements for adoption and care of refugee children. Also includes correspondence from officials of the Committee and other civilian agencies actively engaged in refugee work, as well as a few letters from State Department officials; transcripts of Committee meetings; and reports on care of children.
Among the more significant items in this file are: exchanges with Under Secretary Sumner Welles and Assistant Secretary A.A. Berle relating to specific refugee cases; correspondence with Marshall Field, usually about financial matters; communications from chairman Frank Kingdon of the Emergency Rescue Committee concerning contributions for the care and rescue of refugees from occupied Europe; and memoranda on the President's wish to pay the passage for children recommended for evacuation by Muriel Martineau, an old friend of the President's family.
--Contributions. 1933-1945. 20 Containers. Correspondence, telegrams, memoranda, statements of collections and expenditures, reports, receipts, tickets, lists, newspaper clippings, pamphlets and other printed material. Arranged chronologically and thereunder in rough alphabetical order by name of correspondent or organization.
File relates to the financial contributions made by Mrs. Roosevelt to organizations, volunteer groups and individuals engaged in social work. Her charities extended to more than one hundred institutions and welfare organizations. Also filed herein are receipts from organizations that received contributions; correspondence from organizations that benefitted from regular contributions; literature describing the work of various groups; and reports from volunteer workers and field representatives on matters of health, diet, employment, education and financial condition.
There are a few exchanges between the President and Mrs. Roosevelt on such joint contributions as St. James Episcopal Church, Hyde Park, St. Anne's Episcopal Church, Hyde Park, St. Anne's Episcopal Church, Campobello, New Brunswick, Democratic County Committee (Dutchess Co., NY), James Roosevelt Memorial Library, Hyde Park and the National Cathedral, Washington.
Among the papers are appeals from prominent persons for various charities; Marian Anderson (Riverdale Children's Association, New York), Mrs. Clifford Durr (The Southern Conference for Human Welfare) Ernest Hemingway (American Committee for Protection of the Foreign Born), Joe Louis (Department of Race Relations of the Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America), Christopher Morley (Community Service Society of New York), Paul Robeson (Council of African Affairs), Vincent Sheehan (Abraham Lincoln Brigade Veterans), Ida M. Tarbell (Aid to Infantile Paralysis) and Dorothy Thompson (Volunteer Land Corps).
Replies were drafted and signed by Malvina Thompson although Mrs. Roosevelt's instructions appear in the margin of many incoming letters.
--Autographs. 1934-1945. 43 Containers. Correspondence, memoranda, postal cards, cross reference sheets, newspaper and periodical clippings and various enclosures. Arranged chronologically and thereunder in rough alphabetical order by name of correspondent. This file contains requests made of Mrs. Roosevelt to autograph letters, cards, photographs, books, philatelic covers and programs she attended.
Before the war Mrs. Roosevelt usually complied with these requests but after 1941 she declined to give autographs although she might make an exception for a serviceman, a child of a serviceman or a sick person. Many correspondents also asked for the President's signature but in every case Mrs. Roosevelt's staff replied that the President was too busy to do this. Replies were routine and signed either by Malvina Thompson or Ralph Magee.
--Photographs. 1934-1945. 33 Containers. Correspondence, memoranda, telegrams, postal cards, cross reference sheets, newspaper and periodical clippings and various enclosures. Arranged chronologically and thereunder in rough alphabetical order by name of correspondent.
The file contains requests made of Mrs. Roosevelt for her photograph. As a rule the White House staff did not send her photograph but numerous exceptions were made for charitable and civic organizations, political groups, friends, acquaintances, servicemen, government officials and sick or disabled persons. Also requests from photographers, artists and sculptors asking Mrs. Roosevelt to sit which were usually declined.
The series is divided into five parts: 120.1-Photographs Sent; 120.2-Photographs Refused; 120.3-Sittings for Portraits; 120.5-Photographs Distributed by the White House; 120.9-Miscellaneous Photographs.
--News Items. 1934-1945. 230 containers. Correspondence, memoranda, press releases, transcripts of news conferences, speech and article drafts, pamphlets, booklets, reports, article reprints and newspaper and periodical clippings. Arranged chronologically and thereunder in rough alphabetical order by name of correspondent.
This file consists of publications and letters of transmittal received by Mrs. Roosevelt. Although these publications seem to touch on every conceivable type of endeavor a large portion is concerned with contemporary problems in which Mrs. Roosevelt publicly expressed an interest, including social and economic rehabilitation, politics, education and religion, civic planning, the welfare of refugees, Negro matters, youth movement and foreign affairs. Many transmittal letters include comments praising, complaining or questioning administration policies; during the early and mid-1930's focus is on domestic matters but by 1938 anxiety over foreign affairs is reflected in the pronounced increase of incoming material devoted to German and Japanese affairs.
Replies were usually routine acknowledgements drafted and signed by Malvina Thompson or Ralph Magee. Among organizations regularly forwarding printed matter were: American Civic Association, American Federation of Arts, America First, American Jewish Congress, American League Against War and Fascism, American Youth Congress, Christian American Crusade, Committee to Aid Agriculture, Foster Parents Plan for Children of Spain, Indiana State conference on Social Work, Institute of Propaganda Analysis, The Institute of Women's Professional Relations, Labor Housing conference, National Consumers League, National Public Housing Conference, National Recreation Association, No-Sectarian Anti-Nazi League, Spanish Child Welfare Association, Women's Trade Union League.
--Merchandise for Sale. 1934-1945. 51 Containers. Correspondence, memoranda, postal cards, cross reference sheets, newspaper clippings and printed materials. Arranged chronologically and thereunder in rough alphabetical order by name of correspondent.
This file concerns the misfortunes of people during the depression specifically their efforts to sell personal belongings and property. Correspondents include farmers, merchants, the unskilled, professional of all types and the aged. A random list of items offered for sale includes old pistols, snuff boxes, swords, bayonets, muskets, portraits of historical personages, manuscripts, books, coins, stamps, furniture and all kinds of handcraft work. Interspersed among the papers are also letters and commercial lists from collectors and dealers in rare books, manuscripts, china and silver ware and early American furniture.
There are a few memoranda between the President and Mrs. Roosevelt regarding his interests or reaction to items referred to him of local historical or family interest.
Mrs. Roosevelt's replies, drafted by Miss Thompson, are brief but sympathetic. She was compelled to acknowledge her helplessness in assisting most of those people who wrote to her.
--Material Assistance Requested. 1934-1945. 354 Containers. Correspondence, memoranda, telegrams, receipts, reports, cross reference sheets, newspaper and periodical clippings, pamphlets and other enclosures. Arranged chronologically and thereunder in rough alphabetical order by name of correspondent.
This is one of several files among Mrs. Roosevelt's papers relating to requests for assistance. However the title is only roughly descriptive of the contents. Many letters contain thoughtful comment on politics, government, education, unemployment, the war, bigotry or other contemporary issues. In general, the papers reflect the problems of those citizens most acutely affected by the depression and the war. There are pleas from individuals in need of medical aid, hospital care, food, housing and clothing; by the jobless seeking employment; from persons who lost their property; from wives deserted by husbands and similar complaints; letters referred to the appropriate organization whenever possible- for example, persons suffering from poliomyelitis were directed to the Warm Springs (GA) Foundation; applicants for federal employment were advised to contact the Civil Service Commission of the United States Employment Bureau; those in need of legal help were directed to the Legal Aid Society; and cases involving servicemen or their families were referred to the American Red Cross.
Other types of material include requests for copies of her speeches and radio broadcasts; letters asking from stamps and recipes and other articles; correspondence from churches, schools, civic, fraternal and political organizations requesting donations of money, books and clothing; also letters offering remarks on topics mentioned in the "My Day" newspaper column.
There is some correspondence with prominent people include: Edward Bruce (Treasury), Thomas Parran (U.S. Public Health), Frederick D. Patterson (Tuskegee Institute), Henry W. Roberts (author), John W. Studebaker (Dept. of Education), Walter White (NAACP) and Owen D. Young (philanthropist).
The file divides into nine sections: 150.1-Material Assistance Requested; 150.2-Donations Requested; 150.3-Positions Sought Through Mrs. Roosevelt; 150.4-Handcrafts; 150.5-Recipes Requested; 150.6-Requests for Flowers; 150.7-Requests for Copies of Speeches; 150.8-Requests for Books; 150.9-Miscellaneous Requests.
--Genealogy and Biography. 1934-1945. 6 Containers. Correspondence, memoranda, postal cards, genealogical charts, horoscope charts, cross reference sheets, newspaper clippings and printed materials. Arranged chronologically.
Includes letters from individuals asking for biographies of the President and Mrs. Roosevelt and questions concerning Roosevelt genealogy, especially President Roosevelt's six Mayflower ancestors and the Roosevelts in Holland. Also requests for genealogical information on the Livingston, Ludlow, Delano and Ballinger families.
--Appointments. 1934-1945. 74 Containers. Correspondence, memoranda, telegrams, transcripts of conferences and meetings, pamphlets, programs, newspaper and periodical clippings, cross reference sheets and various enclosures. Arranged chronologically and thereunder in rough alphabetical order by name of correspondent.
This file contains requests to visit Mrs. Roosevelt in the White House from school and civic groups and other organization planning trips to Washington; letters from individuals asking for appointments; invitations to attend or speak before various conferences, forums and gatherings. The papers also contain information on Mrs. Roosevelt's trips and speaking engagements. Correspondence from organizations often includes detailed information about projects for which Mrs. Roosevelt's support or interest was solicited. Her replies, always signed by others, do indicate her civic and charitable interest. There is material on education, housing, Negro affairs, economic and social rehabilitation, civil defense, consumer and cooperative activities, the role of women in American life, art projects, Democratic Party affairs, peace movements, youth, Spanish Civil War, refugees, and the internment of Japanese-Americans.
Printed materials concerning the activities of the following organizations will be found in the files: American Friends of German Freedom, American Friends Service Committee, American Labor Party, American Student Union, American Youth Commission, American Youth Congress, American Youth Hostels, Good Neighbor League, International Student Service, Labor's Non Partisan League, National Conference of Christians and Jews, National Consumers Conference, National Farmers Union, National League of Women Voters, National Negro Congress, National Student Federation, National Urban League, National Youth Administration, Souther Conference for Human Welfare, Souther Regional Conference, U.S. Student Assembly, World Youth Congress.
--Miscellaneous. 1934-1945. 309 Containers. Correspondence, telegrams, memoranda, cross reference sheets, newspaper clippings, pamphlets, posters and other printed material. Arranged chronologically and thereunder in rough alphabetical order by name of correspondent.
A large part of this file is comprised of "public opinion" letters written in response to Mrs. Roosevelt's public activities and her writings and utterances on contemporary issues. Also there are many letters of protest, particularly during the war period, that complain of the following: conditions in military camps, rent control and inadequate housing, discrimination, food and gasoline rationing and the sale of liquor to young servicemen.
Political letters are scattered throughout the file including: views and forecasts on the presidential elections of 1936, 1940, and 1944; letters endorsing candidates for political office; and pro and con remarks on such political movements as the Townsend Plan, Coughlin's National Union for Social Justice, the America First Committee, and Huey Long's "Share the Wealth" scheme.
Occasional letters from American citizens, some of whom were residing abroad, and letters from citizens of foreign countries are included in the papers. Some of the more interesting of these are: Jesse M. Aldrich (1939) war in Spain; Esparanza Ellis (1944) Trujillo dictatorship; John P. Harrington (1935) war in Ethiopia; Ben Hecht (1945) British censorship after the murder of Lord Moyne in Cairo; Ezra Pound (1935, 1940) politics; Mrs. Josephine Sterling (1939) refugee children; Sada C. Tomlinson (1941) political and military conditions in China; May Cullen White (1940) war in China; and Eugene Wolman (1937) war in Spain.
Correspondence from and about Mrs. Roosevelt's wartime trips to England (1942), the Pacific (1943), and the Caribbean area (1944) are also included in this file.
This series is divided into four sections: 190.1-Criticism re: Negro question, 1942; 190.3-Trip file: England, 1942; 190.4-Trip File: Pacific Theatre, 1943; 190.5-Trip File: Caribbean Area, 1944.
--Girl Scouts of America. 1934-1945. 2 Containers. Correspondence, memoranda, printed material and newspaper clippings. Arranged chronologically.
Letters from girls applying for membership in the Girl Scouts (Mrs. Roosevelt served as honorary president); requests for help in financing local programs; and information on procedures for organizing new chapters. All such requests were referred to national headquarters in New York City. Also a few items from the national director on field work; administrative policy and ceremonial affairs.
--Receipts for Articles Mailed from the White House. 1933-1945. 1 Container. A file of material consisting of receipts and notes relating to registered letters sent from the White House to the Roosevelt family, friends, banks, federal agencies and business concerns. The file concerns the routine business of registering and insuring outgoing mail. A few postal notices of mail intended for the White House and held from postage are included in the file. Notes by members of the clerical staff regarding instructions about addresses, names and value of articles.
--Prohibition. 1934-1944. 2 Containers. Correspondence, telegrams, newspaper clippings, leaflets, pamphlets and other printed material. Arranged chronologically.
Letters in this file are from individuals opposed to the sale of liquor, particularly members of the Women's Christian Temperance Union and religious organizations. Many correspondents protested the serving of wine at White House functions. Mrs. Roosevelt's replies were prepared by Mrs. James Helm.
--White House Telegrams. 1933-1939. 6 containers. Telegrams and night letters. Arranged chronologically. This file consists of copies of several thousand outgoing telegrams and night letters sent by Mrs. Roosevelt or under her name by Malvina Thompson for the period 1933-1939. Telegrams for the following years of the White House period were not filed separately as these but interfiled in the appropriate correspondence files, according to chronological and alphabetical order.
--Topical File. 1933-1945. 2 Containers. Correspondence, memoranda, lists, reports, etc. Arranged alphabetically according to folder title.
Material in this file, arranged by Mrs. Roosevelt, consists of various, unrelated subjects. Some of which include: birthday and Christmas books, miscellaneous gift orders, Christmas card, inauguration and wedding lists, memoranda to her staff, personal and general correspondence, material concerned with the Office of Civil Defense, war matters, press conferences, etc. (For a complete list of subjects, see the container list to this collection).
--Address Books and Index Cards. 1933-1945. 2 Containers. Arranged chronologically and thereunder alphabetically. This file consists of the address records kept by Mrs. Roosevelt and her secretary, Malvina Thompson during the period 1933-1945. The many addresses of family members, friends, business associates and acquaintances collected over the years, fill two bound address books, two black loose-leaf binders and two sets of index file cards.
--Engagement Books. 1933-April 12, 1945. 2 Containers. These engagement books are merely day by day calendar reminders of Mrs. Roosevelt's appointments, luncheons, dinners, meetings etc.
--Miscellaneous Newspaper Clippings re: E.R. 1933-1945. 1 container. This file consists of unarranged newspaper clippings from various newspapers, chiefly from New York and Washington, D.C. Most of the clippings are from Luce's Clipping Bureau.
--Honorary Degrees, Citations from Academic Institutions. 1933-1945. 1 Container. The material in this file represents only a small number of the many honorary degrees and citations Mrs. Roosevelt received during her lifetime. Among those found herein are: an Honorary Doctor of Laws Degree from Muhlenberg College, Allentown, Pennsylvania, the Pi Delta Epsilon Award from American University, the dedication scroll for Eleanor Roosevelt Hall, Rhode Island State College, Class Day Award, New York University, etc. (for other awards and honorary degrees, see: Case Drawer 44, E.R.: Bound Miscellany).
--Non-Academic Awards, Citations, Memberships, etc. 1933-1945. 1 Container. This unarranged file consists of a number of oversized awards, certificates, memberships, citations, etc. which Mrs. Roosevelt, as First Lady, received from various groups and organizations. Some of these represented include: Midwest Antiquarian Association, International Ladies Garment Workers Union chorus, Boys Club of the Metropolitan Police, D.C., American Women's Clubs, National Education Association, United Charity Institutions of Jerusalem, National Congress of Parents and Teachers.
--Miscellaneous Reports. 1932-1945. 13 Containers. Arranged chronologically only. This file contains a wide variety of miscellaneous reports, abstracts, studies, reviews, etc., received by Mrs. Roosevelt at the White House.
The subject range of these materials is wide, for example, in the same container, may be found such divergent items as: a report from the Office of the U.S. Attorney General (1934), and a study of the flags of Texas (1934). Some other materials found in this file include: the Annual Report of the Women's Trade Union League of New York (1932), a study of the White House Conferences (1933), a guide book to Fairmont, West Virginia (1934), summaries from the Women's Division of the Democratic National Campaign Committee (1932), reports from the FERA (1934), TVA (1937, 1939), NYA (1942), WPA (1935), studies on Dutchess county and Defense (1941), the Population Policy and Social Planning (1939), etc.
--Benedict Research Reports. March, 1933-April, 1935. 1 Container. Arranged in chronological order. The material found in this file was compiled by Editorial Research Reports, Washington, D.C. This agency maintained a weekly and/or daily service which provided its subscribers with information and background material of national and international significance. This file contains two years of material (weekly and monthly bulletins) sent to the White House and Mrs. Roosevelt which was used at various times in the preparation of speeches, articles, radio addresses, etc.
--Scrapbooks Presented to E.R. 1933-1945. 1 Container. The few volumes found in this file represent only a very small sampling of the many such mementoes presented to Mrs. Roosevelt by well-wishers over the many years she spent as First Lady. Included herein are scrapbooks made in honor of the president and Mrs. Roosevelt as well as those commemorating special places and occasions.
--Amidst Crowded Days. 1942. 2 volumes. These two volumes compose a 1942 diary in clippings of Mrs. Roosevelt. This work was compiled, edited and executed by A. Cypen Lubitsh in 1943. These magnificent books, bound in leather and wood, contain pictures and articles from a number of New York, Washington and Los Angeles newspapers substantially in 1942. Volume I contains material chronologically arranged from December, 1941 through the OCD controversy i.e. January-February, 1942; Volume II begins with March, 1942 and concludes with June of the same year.
--Speech and Article File. 1917-1962. 155 Containers. This file is composed of hundreds of Mrs. Roosevelt's speeches, articles, radio addresses, statements, reviews, etc., which were written, delivered, presented or read in the United States and/or abroad, over a span of approximately 45 years. The file is arranged in rough chronological order but the container list provides a catalogue of the contents of each container.
--Book and Manuscript File. 1932-1963. 36 Containers. This file represents another aspect of Mrs. Roosevelt's writing career. In it, are the manuscripts, drafts, proofs, notes and correspondence relating to over 15 published works. The container list details the contents of each container.
Also, in this file are the notes, drafts and sketches for Elliott Roosevelt's book, Hunting Big Game in the 80's, Letters of Elliott Roosevelt, which Mrs. Roosevelt edited in memory of her father in 1933; and a printers' proof of Alfred Steinberg's, Mrs. R.: The Life of Eleanor Roosevelt.

Finding Aid to Part II of Eleanor Roosevelt's Papers, 1945-1964:

--Condolence Correspondence

. April-May, August-September 1945. 29 Containers. Correspondence, sympathy cards, postcards, telegrams, as well as copies of prayers, poems, addresses, musical compositions and various tributes following the death of President Roosevelt on April 12, 1945. Although the majority of this correspondence was received in April and May 1945, Mrs. Roosevelt continued to receive expressions of sympathy throughout the year as well as in 1946. She received various tributes to President Roosevelt up until her death in 1962.
Most of the material in this series (arranged in rough chronological order by month) consisted of correspondence and cards expressing sympathy at the President's death. Nearly all of the materials received from the general public remained in the original envelopes, although these had been slit open. A random sample of this material together with the few letters acknowledged by Mrs. Roosevelt (Special Condolence Correspondence) had been retained. Additional letters of sympathy and tribute can be found in Mrs. Roosevelt's Miscellaneous Correspondence and General Correspondence.
--Material re: "Franklin D. Roosevelt and Hyde Park." 1946. 1 Container. Correspondence and various undated drafts of the pamphlet "Franklin D. Roosevelt and Hyde Park," which at the request of the National Park Service. The pamphlet, which was first published in 1949, was intended as a brief introduction for the general public.
--Miscellaneous Correspondence. Pre-April 12, 1945-1951. 41 Containers. Correspondence, telegrams, invitations, greeting cards, tributes, memorials, poems, programs, articles, newspaper clippings, and various printed materials. Arranged in rough chronological order.
The bulk of this series consists of tributes and memorials to Franklin D. Roosevelt. Included are poems, musical compositions, resolutions, essays, newspaper clippings, and miscellaneous printed materials. Much of the material was received around the anniversaries of President Roosevelt's birth and death. Similar material is contained in the series of Condolence Correspondence as well as the General Correspondence.
This series also contains correspondence, telegrams, memoranda, and reports dated prior to April 12, 1945. This material was apparently either pending or awaiting filing in Mrs. Roosevelt's White House files when the President died. Included are a few memoranda between Mrs. Roosevelt and the President; for the most part these are routine, dealing with correspondence forwarded for the other's attention. There are also communications between Mrs. Roosevelt and various officials, including James M. Barnes, Ruby Black, Ugo Carusi, James Forrestal, J.W. Fulbright , Frank T. Hines, James A. Krug, Henry Morgethau, Jr., and Anna M. Rosenberg. This material also includes correspondence from the general public requesting autographs, speaking engagements, endorsements, and assistance or speaking engagements, endorsements, and assistance or advice of one type or another. Similarly, there are comments on Mrs. Roosevelt's activities as well as her columns, and a number of replies dated April 12, 1945, from Mrs. Roosevelt and her secretary, Malvina Thompson, which were never signed or sent.
The correspondence for March 1950 contains a number of letters from the general public regarding the controversy over public aid to parochial education (see also Public Reaction Correspondence, Spellman Controversy). In addition, correspondence for that year includes several letters addressed to Mrs. Roosevelt in her role as representative to the United Nations. Most of these deal with Far Eastern matters, including the seating of Communist China in the U.N. and the problem of American defense of Chiang Kai-shek's regime on Taiwan. Similar material can be found in Mrs. Roosevelt's U.N. correspondence.
--Correspondence re: Wiltwyck School. 1947-1951. 1 Container. The correspondence in this series reflects Mrs. Roosevelt's interest in and assistance to the Wiltwyck School for Boys at Esopus, New York, a school for delinquent boys between the ages of 7 and 12. Mrs. Roosevelt served for many years as a member of the school's board of directors. Much of the correspondence concerns efforts to raise money for the school; included is Mrs. Roosevelt's correspondence with officials of the school and fellow board members, as well as various individuals who may have been interested in the institution. Also included are various reports on the progress and finances of the school and receipts for personal contributions from Mrs. Roosevelt. Similar material is located in the series of General Correspondence.
--General Correspondence. 1945-1962. 816 Containers. Correspondence, memoranda, telegrams, postal cards, greeting cards, invitations, reports, articles, newspaper clippings, and various processed material. Except for the years 1945-1948 the material is arranged chronologically and thereunder in very rough alphabetical order by name of correspondent or organization. Material for 1945-1948 has been merged into a single block and is arranged alphabetically thereunder.
This series contains the great bulk of Mrs. Roosevelt's personal correspondence in the post-White House years. A large portion of this file consists of letters from the general public, although there are letters from personal friends, acquaintances, relatives, and associates. Mrs. Roosevelt had only a small personal staff to help her with the high quantity of mail she received daily. With only her secretary Malvina C. Thompson, and later Maureen Corr, and occasional part-time or summer help, much of the incoming correspondence was filed variously under name of correspondent or organization. Mrs. Roosevelt frequently referred letters to public officials or agencies, as well as to private individuals and organizations, for assistance or information. Replies she received were often filed under the name of the original correspondent. Consequently, officials are scattered throughout the files. One cannot, for example, find all the correspondence with George Marshall for any give year filed under either "Marshall" or "State Department."
In addition, no carbon copies of most of Mrs. Roosevelt's replies were retained. Although on most of the incoming letters Mrs. Roosevelt indicated the nature of the reply she wanted drafted, her notations are practically illegible. There are some long-hand draft replies in a secretary's hand, and, of course, some typed carbons; the latter are most common in the first few years of this correspondence, becoming less frequent in later years.
The correspondence reflects Mrs. Roosevelt's myriad activities during these years. A considerable portion of the correspondence for each year consist of tributes and criticism regarding President Roosevelt; requests for photographs, autographs, stamps, and franked envelopes requests for material assistance, employment, interviews, and advice on a great variety of problems; requests for statements, endorsements, and contributions; invitations to speak, attend dinners, meetings, and other affairs; requests to write books and articles, as well as prefaces and introductions for other authors. Also included are a large number of public reaction letters concerning Mrs. Roosevelt's speeches and writings, especially her columns "My Day" and "If You Ask Me." There are, moreover, assorted plans, projects, ideas, and proposals submitted to her for assistance or advice. Although much of the material is routine, it should be noted that Mrs. Roosevelt at times wrote significant responses on both domestic and international issues to obscure people. These responses were most frequent in the late 1940's and early 1950's, becoming less common in later years. Likewise, there are proportionately more requests for autographs, information for term papers, and similar routine matters in the last few years of the series.
The topics under discussion in this correspondence are those that were generally of public concern during these years. For example, in the years just after World War II there are many letters relating to the problems of refugees and displaced persons, as well as the question of American relief efforts. In addition, material for the late 1940's includes correspondence concerning the United Nations, particularly the Human Rights Commission and the Palestine issue. There is also correspondence concerning American foreign policy, including comments on the Truman Doctrine, Marshall Plan, NATO, and deteriorating relations with the Soviet Union. throughout the series there is correspondence concerning domestic politics; during the late 1940's much of this relates to the 1948 election, and Mrs. Roosevelt's views of the Progressive party and the candidacy of Henry A. Wallace.
In 1949 there is a considerable amount of correspondence concerning the controversy with Cardinal Spellman over public aid to parochial schools. There is also correspondence in 1949 reflecting Mrs. Roosevelt's views of the Franco regime in Spain and the debate over U.S. recognition of the Spanish government. Correspondence on the Cold War continues into the 1950's, and during the Korean War there is a considerable amount of material on that conflict. Other topics reflected in the correspondence during the early 1950's are disarmament and the question of seating the Spanish mission in the United Nations. In addition, there are a considerable number of letters concerning communism and the McCarthy hearings.
The question of minority rights is a theme which reoccurs throughout the correspondence. There are some letters in almost every year concerning the plight of blacks, Indians, and women. The issue of racial integration, and especially school desegregation, are the subjects of many letters in the 1950's. Other topics or themes encountered in correspondence in 1956 and 1957 are the Suez crisis and the Hungarian uprising. There is public reaction correspondence in 1956 over Mrs. Roosevelt's signing a petition which called for amnesty for a number of individuals convicted of sedition under the Smith Act some years earlier. Likewise, there is a sizeable amount of material on the 1956 presidential campaign.
Mrs. Roosevelt's trips abroad are another frequently encountered subject in this series. Mrs. Roosevelt's visit to the Soviet Union in 1957 brought perhaps the most public reaction mail of her many trips. There is also correspondence in 1957 on the refusal of the State Department to grant her a visa to visit Red China.
In general, there is little substantive material in the last few years of this correspondence. As noted previously, requests for autographs, information advice, endorsements, and speeches become even more frequent than in earlier years, and, correspondingly, there are fewer extensive replies from Mrs. Roosevelt. There is, however, material concerning the 1960 presidential campaign, including some correspondence between Mrs. Roosevelt and John F. Kennedy. (For additional Kennedy correspondence, see: Materials from Other Repositories Collection. Check with Reference Archivist). In 1961 there are congratulations on her appointment as a delegate to the U.N. General Assembly, and a few items relating to her work in the U.N. Material for 1962 includes expressions of concern over Mrs. Roosevelt's declining health.
The series includes material concerning a vast number of organizations in which Mrs. Roosevelt was interested. These include educational, humanitarian, philanthropic, and political organizations. There is material relating to colleges with which Mrs. Roosevelt was concerned or associated, particularly, Bethune-Cookman College (Mary McLeod Bethune), Brandeis University (A.L. Sachar), Howard University (Mordecai Johnson), and Roosevelt College (Edward J. Sparling). Although by no means an inclusive list, the following are among the organizations represented in this series: American Association for the United Nations; American Civil Liberties Union; American Committee for Yugoslav Relief, Inc.; American Committee on Africa, Inc.; American Council for a Democratic Greece; Americans for Democratic Action; American Friends Service Committee; American Relief for Greek Democracy; Citizens Committee for Children of New York City, Inc.; Citizens Committee on Displaced Persons; Committee for the Nation's Health; Democratic National Committee; Encampment for Citizenship; Franklin D. Roosevelt Memorial Foundation; Julius Rosenwald Fund; Junior Literary Guild; Lincoln Center Advisory Committee (a Poughkeepsie, New York, resettlement house); The Nation Associates; National Association for the Advancement of Colored People; National Citizens Committee for United Nations Day; National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing; National Conference on the German Problem; National Council of Negro Women, Inc.; National Mental Health Foundation; New York Committee for Democratic Voters; President's Commission on Higher Education; United Nations Student Association; Wiltwyck School for Boys, Inc.; Women's Action Committee for Lasting Peace.
The last box of correspondence in this series consists of correspondence between Mrs. Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman, 1945-1962. The correspondence ranges over a variety of topics, including post-war problems, United Nations affairs, United States foreign policy, domestic affairs, and politics. There is also correspondence concerning speeches, statements, columns, invitations, and the like. A rough draft register is included with this correspondence.
--United Nations Correspondence and Publications. 1945-1955. 35 Containers. Correspondence, telegrams, cablegrams, memoranda, reports, invitations, resolutions, newspaper clippings, transcripts of speeches, calling cards, working drafts, position papers, agendas, schedules, programs, petitions, as well as various processed materials including articles, brochures, clippings, resolutions and transcripts of proceedings.
This series consists of materials Mrs. Roosevelt received in her capacity as United States representative to the United Nations. Appointed by President Truman a member of the United States delegation to the first session of the General Assembly in London in January, 1946, Mrs. Roosevelt served on the Third Committee which dealt with humanitarian, social and cultural matters. In addition to serving as a member of the delegation to the General Assembly, Mrs. Roosevelt was a member of the U.N.'s Human Rights Commission and was chairman of that body from its inception in 1947 until 1951. Largely through her efforts the Declaration of Human Rights was adopted by the General Assembly on December 10, 1948. Mrs. Roosevelt resigned her U.N. position following the election of Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1952, but served again briefly in the U.N. when President Kennedy appointed her a representative to the fifteenth session of the General Assembly in 1961.
The bulk of material in the series consists of correspondence received from the general public in the United States and abroad. Most letters have a typed response from Mrs. Roosevelt, although some merely contain a notation in her handwriting as to how the letter should be answered. Occasionally draft responses prepared by one of her secretaries are attached to the correspondence. The material includes letters of support for the U.N.; commendations of Mrs. Roosevelt's work, suggestions of various programs, causes, or resolutions that Mrs. Roosevelt and the U.N. should support, and requests for tickets to U.N. meetings. Also included are invitations from fellow delegates and friends to attend dinners, receptions, meetings, as well as requests for interviews, speeches, and articles.
The series also contains correspondence, memoranda, position papers, draft resolutions and background materials which Mrs. Roosevelt received from State Department and United Nations officials. There is correspondence with State Department and delegation colleagues on various topics before the U.N. such as human rights, refugees, and Palestine. Also included is Mrs. Roosevelt's diary from the first session of the General Assembly in London in 1946, which she kept in the form of letters to her secretary, Malvina Thompson. The material for 1945 includes a number of letters from organizations giving their views of the objectives which should be realized through the U.N. Among the organizations represented are: American Association for the United Nations, American Association of University Women, Church Peace Union, General Federation of Women's Clubs, Lions, International, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, National Congress of Parents and Teachers, the National Grange, National League of Women Voters, and the United States Chamber of Commerce.
Although the correspondence is divided into two portions, "United Nations" and "Human Rights Commission," both of which are arranged chronologically, material on a given topic might be located in either portion. For example there is a considerable amount of material on the Human Rights Commission filed in the general U.N. correspondence. Moreover, the series contains one box of correspondence, reports, background material, and processed U.N. documents Mrs. Roosevelt received in connection with the meeting of the second session of the Human Rights Commission at Geneva in 1947. In addition, there is one box of material relating to German prisoners of war still held in the Soviet Union, Poland, and Yugoslavia in 1949. Included are five folders of forms listing these prisoners, and a petition and memorandum submitted in November, 1949 by the Zentralberatungstelle Der Volkdeutschen to Mrs. Roosevelt asking her to help in securing release of the prisoners.
The series also includes publications and other processed materials Mrs. Roosevelt received in the course of her duties at the United nations. The bulk of this material consist of processed copies of U.N. working papers, drafts, resolutions, transcripts of proceedings, agendas and the like, which apparently were routinely sent to delegates. In addition, there are some U.S. delegation documents as well as background materials provided by the State Department. Finally, the publications include articles, periodicals, journals, and a few newspapers that Mrs. Roosevelt accumulated in her U.N. files. As with the correspondence, the publications have been divided into two portions; U.N. publications and Human Rights Commission publications. This distinction is not always clear-cut, however, and several Human Rights Commission publications are among the general U.N. publications.
Additional correspondence concerning Mrs. Roosevelt's work at the United Nations is contained in the General Correspondence series.
--American Association For the United Nations, Correspondence. 1953-1962. 33 Containers. Correspondence, memoranda, telegrams, greeting cards, appointment diaries, reports, programs, newsletters, newspaper clippings, articles, and periodicals.
This series consists of materials Mrs. Roosevelt received in the course of her work for the American Association for the United Nations (AAUN). As an organization designed to inform the public about the work of the United Nations, to insure more effective American participation in the U.N.; and to seek methods of strengthening the international body, the AAUN carried on an extensive program providing literature and speakers, cooperating with local schools and organizations, and sponsoring observances such as U.N. WEEK and Human Rights Day. Following her resignation from the U.N., Mrs. Roosevelt in 1953 volunteered her services to Clark Eichlberger, director of the AAUN. Under AAUN auspices Mrs. Roosevelt in the mid and late-1950's spoke throughout the United States attempting to elicit enthusiasm and support for the Untied Nations.
The principal body of correspondence in the series is arranged alphabetically by name of correspondent or organization. Much of this correspondence is routine, consisting of invitations to speak, or attend various functions such as dinners, receptions, symposia, and the like; requests for articles, statements, endorsements, assistance, or information; inquiries regarding employment at the United Nations; and greeting cards. In addition, there are letters asking for information on the United Nations or concerning U.N. policy or goals, as well as a sizeable number of plans, proposals and projects for world peace and international cooperation. The series also contains some materials concerning AAUN business. Most letters have typed replies from Mrs. Roosevelt, many apparently drafted by her secretary at the AAUN, Miss Patricia Baillargeon.
In addition to the main body of correspondence this series contains four boxes of correspondence and related material concerning engagements, including speeches, dinners, and other programs. This material is divided into engagements accepted and engagements declined and thereunder in rough chronological order. Also included in this series are Mrs. Roosevelt's AAUN engagement books and appointment diaries, 1953-1962, and publications sent to her at the AAUN. Finally, there is one box of "Special Files" which contains folders on such unrelated topics as her 1954 speech at Brandeis University, publicity, Mrs. Roosevelt's plans for a trip to Russia in 1954, (later canceled) her 70th birthday celebration, speaking engagements canceled (1953), and District 65 of the Retail, Wholesale, and Department Store Union.Additional material concerning the AAUN is located in the General Correspondence.
--Speaking and Other Engagements: Correspondence. 1945-1952. 15 Containers. Correspondence, memoranda, telegrams, programs, invitations, newspaper clippings and other printed material. Arranged chronologically and thereunder alphabetically.
Contains correspondence inviting Mrs. Roosevelt to serve as sponsor or to speak before various gatherings, usually in behalf of civic, cultural or philanthropic causes. Mrs. Roosevelt often agreed to serve as patroness for those organizations dedicated to the general welfare. Also includes invitations to accept awards and citations and requests for permission to use her name. The outline of Mrs. Roosevelt's response, dictated to her secretary, is usually attached to the incoming letter. Similar material is located in the General Correspondence, particularly for the period after 1952.
--Topical Files. 1945-1962. 8 Containers Correspondence, memoranda, telegrams, form letters, membership cards, health forms, permits, licenses, passports, press releases, postal cards, brochures, pamphlets and newspaper clippings. Arranged alphabetically by file title.
This file consists of material on subjects that are completely unrelated, such as: reader's comments on the "My Day" column, Mrs. Roosevelt's application for a pistol permit, gift and invitation lists, Film Council of America, FDR Memorial Foundation and the Eleanor Roosevelt Cancer Fund. Also Mrs. Roosevelt's activities as chairman of the U.N. Hospitality Committee, 1954-1957, and as chairman of the President's Commission on the Status of Women, 1962. Additional material on certain of these topics, for instance the FDR Memorial Foundation, will be found in the General Correspondence. (For a complete list of folder titles, see the container list to this collection.)
--Trip Files. 1946-1962. 23 Containers. Correspondence, memoranda, telegrams, postal cards, copies of speeches, itineraries, press releases, drafts of "My Day" column, pamphlets and other processed and printed materials. Arranged chronologically by trip.
This file includes correspondence from government officials and prominent individuals suggesting people to meet and places to see; invitations from individuals and organizations to speak or appear before various gatherings during her tours. Also letters of welcome and appreciation; requests for assistance; and letters reacting to Mrs. Roosevelt's utterances while on tour. The papers contain a small amount of correspondence on matters unrelated to her trips. Presumably, these items were filed here simply because they were received while Mrs. Roosevelt was on tour.
Her first trip was to Germany in 1946 where she visited a number of DP camps. In the spring of 1948 Mrs. Roosevelt went to London for unveiling of the FDR Statue in Grosvenor Square. She toured Western Europe in 1948, 1950, 1955, and 1956. In 1953 Mrs. Roosevelt took an around-the-world trip that began with six weeks in Japan. Her stop there was at the invitation of the U.S. Committee on Interchange with Japan. During her stay she wrote frequently to Dean Harry Carman of Columbia, coordinator of her visit, on her observations of living and working conditions and the problems of the American occupation. From Japan Mrs. Roosevelt went on to Hong Kong, Greece, Yugoslavia, London and Paris. She visited Russia in 1957, meeting with Khrushchev at Yalta. She returned to Israel twice, the last time in February 1962.
--Public Reaction Mail: Spellman Controversy. 1949. 44 Containers.
--E.R.'s Speech, Democratic National Convention, 1952. 1 Container.
--Senator Joseph McCarthy, 1954. 1 Container. Correspondence, telegrams, postal cards, pamphlets and newspaper clippings. In her "My Day" column of June 23, 1949 Mrs. Roosevelt publicized her support for the Braden Bill, a measure then before Congress to extend federal assistance to the nation's public schools while withholding it from parochial schools. Francis Cardinal Spellman, Roman Catholic archbishop of New York, assailed Mrs. Roosevelt for her stand in an open letter (text, New York Times, July 23, 1949). The Cardinal's letter and Mrs. Roosevelt's response (text, New York Times, July 28) attracted a great deal of attention and brought Mrs. Roosevelt a flood of public reaction mail. The overwhelming majority of the six thousand persons writing favored her position of federal aid to education.
This file includes the exchange between Spellman and Eleanor Roosevelt and correspondence from the public at large. The reaction mail is separated as to those opposed and those in favor of Mrs. Roosevelt's position and thereunder geographically by State of residence of Correspondent.
Also contains a small amount of correspondence relating to Mrs. Roosevelt's speech before the Democratic National Committee as well as reaction mail to her "My Day" columns on Senator Joseph McCarthy in 1954. Similar material on these topics will be found in the General Correspondence.
--Honorary Degrees and Non Academic Awards. 1945-1962. 2 Containers. Eleanor Roosevelt was the recipient of 35 honorary degrees, 29 of which were awarded after the death of Franklin Roosevelt. Many of these were conferred by foreign universities, including: Utrecht, Lyon, Oxford, McGill, Allahabad, Delhi and Manitoba. Also, Amherst, Bethune-Cookman, Brandeis, Hebrew Union, Hobart, Roosevelt, Smith and Yeshiva. Unarranged. Only a few of the degrees are in the container, the remainder are in Case Drawer 44 E.R.: Bound Miscellany.
In addition, she received a number of medals, honorary memberships, scrolls, certificates of merit and citations from a cross section of humanitarian, political, religious and educational institutions. Unarranged.
--Engagement Books. 1945-1962. 4 Containers. These engagement books are merely day by day reminders of appointments, meetings, luncheons, dinners and speaking engagements. Arranged in chronological order. Entries were made in inexpensive 4 by 6-inch spiral books, one book for each three month period. Many entries are difficult to read because of Mrs. Roosevelt's near illegible hand. Engagement books can also be found in the AAUN series.
--Miscellaneous Printed Materials. Pre-1945-1962. 13 Containers. Letters of transmittal, brochures, booklets, pamphlets, magazines, newspaper and periodical clippings, other processed and printed material, musical scores, invitations and programs. Arranged chronologically by date received or by date of publication.
This file consists of musical scores, invitations, programs and publications received by Mrs. Roosevelt. A large portion of the publications reflect the activities of educational, religious, medical, governmental and philanthropic organizations.
--Greetings, Condolences and Tributes. 1950-1964. 15 Containers. Correspondence, cards, telegrams, newspaper clippings and other printed materials. Arranged chronologically by year only.
This file included messages of appreciation, birthday wishes, Christmas greetings and "get well" cards. Messages from relatives, close friends, and prominent persons were segregated and placed in VIP folders by Mrs. Roosevelt's secretary. There were also condolence letters and cards received by the Roosevelt family, the Roosevelt Library, the White House and the Department of State at the time of Mrs. Roosevelt's death, and a small amount of condolence mail received by Mrs. Roosevelt after the death of her secretary, Malvina Thompson, and the accidental death of her grandchild, Sara Roosevelt, in 1960.
The VIP greetings, material on Mrs. Roosevelt's death and funeral and condolence letters and cards received at the time of Mrs. Roosevelt's death have been retained. The remainder, consisting mostly of greetings and "get well" cards, has been destroyed.
--Nobel Peace Prize, copies of Correspondence Concerning. 1 Container. In 1961 and again the following year, Eleanor Roosevelt was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize. In 1964 an effort was made for the posthumous award. Among those who wrote to the Nobel Institute Award Committee urging such an award were: President Harry S. Truman, The Earl Atlee, David Ben-Gurion, Sir Alec Douglas-Home, Arthur Goldberg, W. Averell Harriman, Hubert Humphrey, Henry Kissinger, Jean Monnet, Walter Reuther, Nelson Rockefeller, and Margaret Chase Smith. Officials of the Institute, however, held that its rules would not permit a post mortem award. The file includes a letter of February 21, 1961 from Adlai Stevenson nominating Mrs. Roosevelt for the Peace Prize, and a letter of January 23, 1962 from President Kennedy supporting Mrs. Roosevelt's candidacy.
--Business and Financial Matters. 1917?-1962. 73 Containers. Correspondence, contracts, forms, insurance policies, bond lists, accounts, vouchers, check stubs, bank statements, canceled checks, miscellaneous bills and receipts.
This file includes substantial correspondence between Mrs. Roosevelt and her literary agents George Byue (1935-1949) and Nannine Joseph (1952-1962) as well as with W. Colston Leigh Agency which handled her speaking engagements and lecture tours. Also, correspondence and contracts with publishers.
The series also contains correspondence and materials concerning Mrs. Roosevelt's residences in New York City and Hyde Park, Todhunter School and the Val-Kill Shop as well as miscellaneous legal matters relating to Mrs. Roosevelt's staff and the estates of the late President, Malvina Thompson, her secretary, Susan L. Parish, her cousin, and G. Hall Roosevelt, her brother.
--Eleanor Roosevelt Oral History Transcripts: Eleanor Roosevelt is mentioned in the oral histories of the following: Minnewa Bell, Robert S. Benjamin, Otto Berge, Viola W. Bernard, John R. Boettinger, Dorothy S. Bowles, Gilbert Calhoun, Catherine F. Connell and Gabrielle O'Neill, Maureen Corr, Archie H. Curnan, Jonathan Daniels, Vladimir Dedijer, Oscar A. deLima, Helen Gahagan Douglas, Olin Dows, Elizabeth B. Drewry, Clark Eichelberger, Stewart Elliott, Marguerite Entrup, May Thompson Evans, Harold Farley, Martha Gellhorn, Nina Roosevelt Gibson, Anne Ward Gilbert and O. Rundle, James Frederick Green, Edna P. Gurewitsch, Grania Gurievitch, Gabriele Gutkind, Diana Hopkins Halsted, James A. Halsted, W. Averell Harriman, Elizabeth and John Hight, Joan Morgenthau Hirschorn, Anna Rosenberg Hoffman, Diana Roosevelt Jaicks and Janet Roosevelt Katten, Gordon Kidd, Frank S. Landolfa, Trude W. Lash, Mary Lasker, Estelle Linzer, James I. Loeb, Porter McKeever, Honoria Livingston McVitty, Henry Morgenthau III, Pauli Murray, Edgar Nixon and Jerome Deyo and William Stickle, Esther Peterson, Justine Wise Polier, Joseph L. Rauh, Jr., Roland Redmond, Virginia Rishel, Dorothy Kemp Roosevelt, Elliott Roosevelt, Elliott Roosevelt, Jr. and Chandler Roosevelt Linsley, Franklin D. Roosevelt III, Haven Roosevelt, James Roosevelt, James Roosevelt, Jr., James H. Row, Jr., Abram L. Sachar, Durward V. Sandifer, Joan Roosevelt Schoonmaker, Eleanor Seagraves, C.R. Smith, Marietta Tree, Rexford G. and Grace F. Tugwell, Georgianna V. Turner, Eleanor Roosevelt Wotkyns.

 

Library of Congress, Manuscript Division, Washington, D.C.:
--Eleanor Roosevelt Papers: Includes a copy of a letter from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Mr. Pyle dated April 6, 1939; a copy of a note from ER to Mr. Pyle dated February 14, 1941; a note from ER to Mr. Kohen regarding TLS dated November 8, 1933.
--Franklin Delano Roosevelt Papers: Container 1 includes one photocopy of letter from ER to TR on the subject of FDR/ER marriage dated December 17, (1904).
--Kermit and Belle Wyatt Willard Roosevelt Papers, 1885-1964, ca. 53,000 items: Soldier, explorer, and businessman. Family and general correspondence, diaries, business papers, subject files, and other papers, chiefly 1900-40, of Roosevelt and his wife, Belle Wyatt (Willard) Roosevelt (1892-1968), social leader and businesswoman, reflecting their social, personal, and business activities. Includes Mrs. Roosevelt's World War II diaries recording conversations with President and Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt. Container 14 includes a typed and signed letter of introduction from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Kermit Roosevelt (KR) dated June 2, 1932; a carbon of a response from KR to ER dated July 25, 1932; a typed and signed letter from ER to KR dated August 1, 1932; a typed letter from the secretary of ER to KR dated July 8, 1933; a typed letter from the secretary of ER to KR dated October 30, 1933; a carbon from KR to the secretary of ER dated November 1, 1933. Container 141 includes a carbon regarding the UN from Belle Willard Roosevelt to ER dated November 14, 1952; a carbon on the UN from Belle Wyatt Roosevelt (BWR), undated; a typed and signed letter regarding UN from ER to BWR dated August 21, 1956. Container 174 includes guest lists, acceptances/regrets for party given by BWR for ER dated June 19, 1962. Unpublished finding aid in the repository. Information on literary rights available in the repository.
--Theodore Roosevelt Papers, 1780-1962, ca. 25,000 items: Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Series 1, Container 251 includes an handwritten card from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Theodore Roosevelt (TR) dated May 24, 1913. Series 2, Container 54 includes a letter (not found but listed in index) from TR to ER dated March 6, 1905. Series 2, Container 102 includes a letter (not found but listed in index) from TR to ER dated March 13, 1915. Series 3B, Container 7 includes a cablegram on Nobel Prize money to be used for war effort from TR to ER(?) dated August 26, 1918. Unpublished finding aid in the repository.
--Theodore Roosevelt, Jr.: Container 30 includes an handwritten note from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. (TR, Jr.) dated February 12, 1910; a typed and signed letter from ER to TR, Jr. dated September 9, 1924; a carbon from TR, Jr. to ER dated September 10,1924; a carbon from TR, Jr. to ER dated January 14, 1938; a typed and signed letter from ER to TR, Jr. dated January 20, 1938; a typed and signed note from ER to TR, Jr. dated September 16, 1938; a typed and signed note from ER to TR, Jr. dated June 27, 1939; a typed and signed note from ER to TR, Jr. dated September 19, 1939; a typed and signed note from ER to TR, Jr. dated September 27, 1939; a typed and signed note from ER to TR, Jr. dated January 17, 1940; a carbon of a note from TR, Jr. to ER dated January 26, 1940; a typed and signed letter from ER to TR, Jr. dated September 29, 1943; an handwritten note from ER to Edith (Roosevelt?) dated July 16; and an handwritten letter from ER to Eleanor B. Roosevelt dated July 23, 1945.
--Carl William Ackerman Papers: Container 51 includes a letter from Eleanor Roosevelt to Eleanor Carroll (Columbia School of Journalism) inviting her and Sylvia Bettencourt to lunch (Cabot Awards, vol. 4, 1941) dated November 15, 1941.
--Florence Ellinwood Allen Papers, 1907-65, ca. 2700 items: Lawyer, judge, feminist, author, and lecturer. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt (ER). Container 1 includes a letter from ER to Miss Kenyon regarding dinner in honor of Judge Allen dated August 25, 1948; a invitation to tea from ER to Florence Ellinwood Allen (FEA) dated May 12, 1954; and a letter from ER to FEA expressing appreciation of Allen's work dated October 12, 1959. Finding aid in the library.
--Joseph Wright Alsop and Stewart Oliver Alsop, 1762-1964, 28 ft., ca. 22,000 items: Journalists and authors. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Container 2 includes a note acknowledging request for visit/interview from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Joseph Wright Alsop (JWA) dated July 29, 1939; a letter from ER to JWA concerning FDR's death dated May 15, 1945; a letter from ER to JWA concerning Elliot Roosevelt dated December 5, 1946; a letter from ER to JWA concerning Elliot Roosevelt dated December 29, 1946. Container 8 includes a letter from ER to JWA dated January 21, 1953; a brief note from ER to JWA dated January 31, 1953; a brief note from ER to JWA dated February 10, 1953. Container 15 includes a brief note from ER to JWA dated June 20, 1959. Container 16 includes a brief note from ER to JWA dated July 4, 1960. Unpublished finding aid in the Library. Open to investigators under restrictions accepted by the Library.
--Clinton P. Anderson Papers: Container 942 includes a folder labelled "Broadcasts-Mrs. Roosevelt's Program, March 19, 1950."
--Edgar Ansel and Lilian Mourer Papers: Container 24 a carbon regarding the United Nations from Edgar Ansel Mourer (EAM) to Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) dated May 16, 1947; a carbon regarding the Wester World Magazine from Angele de T. Gingres to ER dated October 10, 1957. Container 112 includes a letter on the Women's Action Committee for Victory and Lasting Peace from Lilian Mourer to ER dated January 7, 1945.
--Henry Hailey Arnold Papers: Container 20 includes a brief typewritten/signed acknowledgment letter from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Henry Hailey Arnold (HHA) dated January 1, 1944 as well as a letter from ER to HHA or Eleanor Arnold.
--Marion (Glass) Banister Papers, 1933-51, 2 ft., Open, Published Guide and register: A teacher, writer, and leader in women's political affairs, Banister (?-1951) was editor and publisher of the Washingtonian magazine from 1929 to 1933 and from 1933 until her death assistant treasurer of the US. Correspondence, publicity material, and memorabilia, some of which relate to the Democratic National Committee.
--James Martin Barnes Papers, 1924-58, 19 ft., ca. 12,000 items: Lawyer, judge, and U.S. Representative from Illinois. Correspondence, memoranda, scrapbooks, photos, and other papers, including extensive material covering Barnes' service as administrative assistant to President Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1943-45, dealing with appointments, patronage, requests of servicemen, and domestic political matters. Important correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt (ER). Container 19 includes copies of letters/memoranda concerning ER or in reply to letters/memoranda from ER for period of 1943 to 1945. Barnes was the administrative secretary to FDR. Unpublished register in the Library. Open to investigators under restrictions accepted by the Library.
--John Davis Batchelder Papers: Container 9 includes a letter from Eleanor Roosevelt to Henry Lee Wasserman typed and signed #1364 dated October 25, 1930.
--Daniel Carter Beard Papers: Container 104 includes an acknowledgment of birthday note from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Daniel Carter Beard (DCB) dated October 13, 1939; a brief note from ER to DCB dated May 1; an acknowledgment note from secretary of ER dated October 13, 1938; and an acknowledgment note from secretary of ER dated September 12, 1939.
--August Belmont Papers: Listed in the First Ladies Index without description.
--George Biddle Papers, 1899-1969, 7 ft., Partially restricted, Published guide and register: Papers of Biddle (1885-), a painter, sculptor, public official and war correspondent. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Container 16 includes a note from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to George Biddle (GB) dated August 4, 1939; a note from ER to GB dated October 14, 1941; a note from ER to GB dated July 3, 1944; a letter from ER to GB dated February 11, 1954.
--Robert Worth Bingham Papers, 1879-1974, ca. 10,500 items: Lawyer, diplomat, and newspaper publisher. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Container 21 includes: a letter from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Robert Bingham (RB) dated January 8, 1934; a note from ER to RB dated October 23, 1934; a note from ER to RB dated January 10, 1935; a note from ER to RB dated May 7, 1935; a note from ER to RB dated June 15, 1935; a note from ER to RB dated May 19, 1936; a note from ER to RB dated June 27, 1936; a note from ER to RB dated September 23, 1936. Various copies of notes, letters, telegrams, from RB to ER for the same period. Unpublished finding aid in the repository. The repository also has 1 reel of microfilm (positive) of some of the diaries.
--Ruby Black Papers: Four folders pertaining to Eleanor Roosevelt: Folder 1 includes 10 letters/notes (typed & signed) from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to reporter Ruby Black (RB). Extensive correspondence from RB to ER (carbon copies). Also letters from Malvina Thompson letters. Folder 2 includes 18 letters/notes (typed & signed) from ER to RB for period 1940-45. Extensive RB to ER (carbon copies). Also letters from Malvina Thompson. Folder 3 includes 9 letters/notes from ER to RB. Folder 4 includes 27 letters/notes from ER to RB for period 1933-37. Plus 5 other letters for the same period.
--Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters Papers: Container 24 includes a brief note from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) dated December 18, 1943; and an acknowledgment from ER's secretary dated February 15, 1943.
--Solon Justus Buck Papers: Container 19 includes a note of regret on behalf of Mrs. Roosevelt for Literary Society meeting dated December 7, 1940.
--Raymond Leslie Buell Papers: Listed in the First Ladies Index without description.
--Edward T. Clark Papers: Container 22 includes calling card, unsigned in envelope of cards and notes of sympathy on T.E. Clark's death - December 1939.
--Congress on Racial Equality (CORE) Papers: Micro, Index in Manuscript Division: 1958-1962 - 14 items listed in index. Letters from and to ER for this period. Note: Index filed under CORE. Collection represents that of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin.
--Capt. James Cook Papers: Photostat. pos. of page from the Argus, (Melbourne?, Australia) containing articles relating to Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) dated September 6, 1943. Mimeographed copy of typed copy of press relating to copy of Cook's journal of his first great voyage of Pacific exploration, presented by Australia to ER -placed by her in the custody of James Cook (JC) dated February 1, 1944.
--Eva L. (Woodworth) Cullis Papers: Listed in the First Ladies Index without description.
--Josephus Daniels Papers: Container 98 includes four lengthy files on Eleanor Roosevelt (notes, letters, invitations which cover the period from 1913 to 1946. Folder 1 - 1913-1934; Folder 2 - 1935-1937; Folder 3 - 1938-1941; Folder 4 -1942-1946.
--W.E.B. Du Bois Papers: Micro, Index in Manuscript Division: Reel 57, frame 741 - Walter White to Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) - issues that NAACP wants stressed in UN (1945); Reel 59, frame 471 - ER concerning the Pan-African Congress Petition to the UN (1946); Reel 60, frame 809 - letters from Du Bois concerning NAACP Petition to the UN (1947); Reel 62, frame 704 - meeting of Du Bois with ER (1948); Reel 63, frame 336 - U.S. UN delegation (1948); Reel 57, frame 1302 - concerning a dinner for ER (1945). Note: The index to Du Bois papers is the only selection. None of the material listed appears to have been written by ER.
--Charles Fahy Papers: Container 13 includes a brief note from sec. to Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Charles Fahy (CF) thanking for concern during ER's illness dated December 3, 1962; Record of adjournment of US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia circuit dated November 8, 1962; Card from family of ER acknowledging sympathy undated.
--James Aloysius Farley Papers: Listed in the First Ladies Index with no description.
--Dave E. (David Edward) Finley Papers, 1921-1977: ca. 31,000 items: Lawyer and museum director. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Container 5 includes a memo with an attachment of a xeroxed copy of "Procedure of the subcommittee upon furnishings and gifts for state rooms of the White House . . ." Signature of ER at bottom of page. Cover memo is dated June 3, 1946. Unpublished finding aid in the repository.
--Minnie Maddern Fiske Papers: Container 4 includes a letter from ER to Minnie Maddern Fiske (MMF) requesting to use statement by MMF in support of FDR as publicity dated September 29, 1928.
--Food for Freedom, Inc., Records Papers, 1942-47, 7 ft.: Correspondence, notes, memoranda, reports, articles, minutes, news releases, reprints, clippings, cartoons, mailing lists, and speeches. Contains correspondence with Eleanor Roosevelt. Container 2 includes correspondence between Harold Weston and ER (Malvina Thompson), March 22, 1943 - November 15, 1943). 7 items. Container 3 includes a letter from Malvina Thompson on behalf of ER expressing thanks for copy of Report of the National Consumers Food Conference dated February 25, 1944. Container 4 includes correspondence between Harold Weston, Florence R. Wyckoff and ER regarding plans for rationing and donations by ER; January 24, 1945 - September 12, 1945. 8 items. Container 5 includes correspondence between Dorothy Dulles Bourne and ER. April 4, 1946, April 9, 1946, and August 20, 1946. Unpublished finding aid in the library.
--Felix Frankfurter Papers, 1864-1965, 105 ft., Open, Published guide: Papers of Frankfurter (1882-1965), a professor of law, associate justice of the US Supreme Court, and author, contain information on his career and on numerous organizations. His correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Container 97 includes correspondence between ER and Felix Frankfurter (FF), 1936-59. Ca. 32 items. Includes brief thank you notes and acknowledgments as well as correspondence about ER's speaking engagement with George Lansbury, use of Justice Holmes' house, an invitation for FF to participate in a broadcast (12/2/41), the Roosevelt National Memorial Committee, and opportunities open to Negroes for a legal education in Washington, DC. Container 122 includes a telegram from ER conveying birthday greetings dated November 15. Container 181 includes a letter from ER to FF regarding FDR's wishes regarding a simple granite memorial to him near the Archives dated March 16, 1961. Container 257 includes correspondence between ER and FF, 1936-62. Ca. 15 items. Includes thank you notes, acknowledgments and enclosures as well as correspondence regarding the Holmes house, opportunities open to Negroes for legal education in Washington, DC, ER's T.V. interview with Atwood.
--Daniel Chester French Papers: Container 56 includes a brief note from ER to Margaret French Cresson regarding mention of Daniel Chester French (DCF) in ER's column and acknowledgments of letters dated August 15, 1941.
--Donald Sergey Friede Papers: Container 3 includes a letter from ER to Friede dated June 30, 1959.
--Bess Furman Papers, 1728-1967, ca. 47,000 items: Journalist and author. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt and Bess Truman. Container 32 includes Folder 1 with ca. 65 items dated 1933-1959. Letters, cards, notes, (some carbons Bess Furman (BF) to Eleanor Roosevelt (ER)), Christmas cards FDR/ER and ER. Several handwritten ER letters/notes; Folder 2 has ca. 115 items dated 1933-1960. Same make up. Interesting material on ER's involvement in UN/international affairs (chiefly BF letters). Container 33 includes Folder 1 with 55 items. Principally 1940s-1950s same contents as above. Also, 3 folders with writings on ER by BF and guest lists for dinners at White House. Unpublished finding aid in the repository.
--James Rudolph Garfield Papers: Container 119 includes a letter from ER to James Rudolph Garfield (JRG) requesting statement on Bok Award dated July 10, 1923 and JRG's reply.
--Eric F. Goldman Papers: Container 61 includes a folder labelled "Roosevelt, Eleanor, commemoration, 1966."
--William Frederick Halsey Papers, 1907-59, ca. 20,000 items, Forms part of the repository's Naval Historical Foundation collection, In part, photocopies: Naval officer. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Container 15 includes a letter from ER to William Frederick Halsey (WFH) requesting support for American Association for the United Nations a memorandum (Feb. 8, 1954) and WFH's reply. Unpublished finding aid in the repository.
--Gilbert A. Harrison Papers: Container 10 includes correspondence from ER to Gilbert A. Harrison (GAH), 1941-58 (ca. 39 items). Bulk of letters 1941-45, focusing on Harrison's activities and experiences in the Royal Air Force during World War II. Collection also includes two clippings about ER's death, press release, letter regarding sponsors of sculpture of ER, and envelopes with commemorative stamps.
--Florence Jaffray (Hurst) Harriman Papers, 1912-50, 12 ft., ca. 9000 items: Author and diplomat. Correspondence, reports, speeches, articles, memoranda, newspaper clippings, pamphlets, and other printed matter, memorabilia, and photos. The bulk of the papers covers Mrs. Harriman's service as Minister to Norway (1937-41) and her subsequent activities in various organizations for world peace. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Container 4 includes a folder marked "Confidential" with a note from ER to Florence Harriman (FH) dated August 14, 1939; a note from ER to FH dated September 11, 1939; a note from ER to FH dated November 20, 1939; a note from ER to FH dated January 20, 1939; a note from ER to FH dated November 4, 1937. Register published in 1958 by the Library of Congress.
--Edith Helm Papers: Listed in the First Ladies Index with no description.
--Lewis Graham Hines Papers: Container 9 includes a letter from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Lewis Graham Hines (LGH) regarding contribution to UN week celebration, typed/signed and dated July 16, 1956.
--Benjamin W. Huebsch Papers: Container 24 includes a letter from ER to Benjamin W. Huebsch (BWH) proposing his participation in advisory committee on project of Joseph Landau to establish a "miniature" AP to give newspapers background information dated May 19, 1950.
--Harold L. Ickes Papers: Container 83 includes a photocopy of original t/s note from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Harold L. Ickes (HLI) dated February 27, 1946; a carbon from HLI to ER dated July 30, 1949; a carbon from HLI to ER dated August 11, 1949; a carbon from HLI to ER dated January 25, 1930. Container 28 includes 23 items chiefly short notes although there are several longer letters from ER to Jane D. Ickes dated 1938-1947 and (1) undated. Note: Approximately 85 entries in card file in Mss. Division for items related to ER in Ickes Secretary of the Interior Files. Filed by subject, listed and arranged by date. No indication is (usually) given in card file as to whether the letter is from ER or to ER and often one or the other exists along with the entry for the item given. There are several blind entries for which either no information could be located or for which no subject category exists in the Ickes papers. The listings were surveyed and several longer and interesting letters from ER on serious subjects were found.
--Jesse Holman Jones Papers: Container 23 includes an interesting collection of correspondence as the issues of the 1930's are brought out in the need for information expressed in ER's letters-particularly housing, employment and loans. Letters include ER to Jesse Holman Jones (JHJ)-September 8, 1933, ER to JHJ-January 9, 1935, ER to JHJ-February 21, 1935, Sec. to ER to JHJ-February 21, 1935, ER to JHJ-December 14, 1936, ER to JHJ-December 18, 1936, Sec. to ER to JHJ-December 20, 1937, ER to JHJ-December 9, 1937, ER to JHJ-December 22, 1937, ER to JHJ-September 25, 1940, ER to JHJ-January 22, 1941, ER to JHJ-January 23, 1941, ER to JHJ-February 11, 1941, ER to JHJ-January 11, 1943, Sec. to ER to JHJ-February 11, 1944, and a program: "Council on Candy as Food in the War Effort presents Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt . . ." Radio address dated December 9, 1942. Also copies of a letter addressed to ER from JHJ.
--Jack Kroll Papers, 1919-69, 8 ft. (ca. 3600 items): Labor leader. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt (ER). Container 1 includes a note from ER to Jack Kroll (JK) on Civilian Defense Program dated December 27, 1941. Unpublished finding aid in the Library.
--Lawrence Kubie Papers: Collection includes a typed and signed note from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Lawrence Kubie (LK) dated October 22, 1951; a typed and signed note from ER to LK dated July 10, 1954; a typed and signed note from ER to LK dated January 30, 1953; a typed and signed note from ER to LK dated December 1, 1954; a typed and signed note from ER to LK dated June 5, 1951; a typed and signed note from ER to LK dated August 27, 1951; a program: "In Tribute to Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt" dated October 11, 1954; and 18 carbon copies of letters from LK to ER principally from the 1950's.
--LaFollette Family Papers: Series C, Container 17 includes a brief note from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Robert M., Jr. dated November 15, 1939.
--Emory Scott Land Papers: Container 29 includes a brief note from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Emory Scott Land (ESL) dated August 14, 1939; an acknowledgment of sympathy from ER to ESL dated April 18, 1945; a copy of a letter from ESL to ER dated August 11, 1939; a copy of a letter from ESL to ER dated February 14, 1945.
--Gertrude Lane Papers: Container 1 includes a brief note from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Gertrude Lane (GL) dated July 26, 1933; a brief note from ER to GL dated April 13, 1935.
--League of Women Voters of the United States Papers, 1892-1956, 486 ft.: Correspondence, minutes, reports, notebooks, announcements, political analyses, manuals, press releases, scrapbooks, broadsides, circulars, clipping, pamphlets, and other printed materials. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished finding aid in the library. Also described in part in the Library's Quarterly Journal of current acquisitions, v. 8, no. 2 (Feb. 1951) p. 3-11. Open to investigators under restrictions accepted by the library.
--William D. Leahy Papers: Container 5 includes a typed note signed sympathy on Mrs. Leahy's death from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to William D. Leahy (WDL) dated June 11, 1942; a typed note, signed from ER to WDL dated May 8, 1945.
--Benjamin Barr Lindsey Papers, 1838-1957, 142 ft., Partially closed, Published guide and register: Professional papers of Lindsey (1869-1943) pertain to his service as a judge and social reformer in Colorado and California. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Container 194 includes a letter/typed, signed (copy) regarding "Children's Bills" and Resolution for Young Democrats from Benjamin Barr Lindsey (BBL) to Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) dated August 5, 1939 a note/typed, signed regarding lowering voting age to 18 From BBL to ER dated August 8, 1939 a typed acknowledgment from Malvina Thompson for ER to BBL dated October 9, 1939. Container 195 includes a carbon copy from BBL to ER dated June 26, 1940; a typed and signed letter from ER to BBL dated August 17, 1940; a typed and signed note from ER to BBL dated April 7, 1941. Container 196 includes a typed and signed note of thanks for an article from ER to BBL dated March 16, 1942; a typed and signed note of thanks from ER to BBL dated March 12, 1943; a typed and signed acknowledgment from ER to BBL dated March 22, 1943. (Containers searched: 182-83, 187, 189, 191-196 of 172-196).
--Alice Roosevelt Longworth Papers: Container 3 includes 2 undated letters from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Alice Roosevelt Longworth (ARL). Probably written before ER's marriage. Also, includes 1 letter from ARL to ER dated December 31, 1907.
--Claire Boothe Luce Papers: Container 9 includes a typed and signed note from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Claire Boothe Luce (CBL) dated September 11, 1939. Container 168 includes a typed and signed letter from ER to CBL dated April 28, 1944. Container 253 includes a signed form letter on Share the Food Day from ER to CBL dated December 7, 1945. Container 338 includes a signed note from ER to CBL dated July 22, 1946. Container 443 includes a telegram from ER to CBL dated April 3, 1950; a letter from ER to Mr. Walton dated June 1, 1950.
--Archibald MacLeish Papers: Container 19 includes a letter from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Mrs Archibald MacLeish (AM) dated January 21, 1942; a note from ER to AM dated January 11, 1943; a letter regarding AM's poem "April Elegy" from ER to AM dated June 11, 1945; a letter from ER to mother of AM dated December 5, 1946; a letter from ER to AM dated June 28, 1948; a note from ER to AM dated July 29, 1949; a note from ER to AM dated August 15, 1949; a newsclipping: Washington Daily News ER's column, "My Day;" August 16, 1949.
--Benjamin Clarke Marsh Papers: Container 1 includes a brief letter from Eleanor Roosevelt to Benjamin Clarke Marsh dated March 4, 1941.
--William Henry (Bill) Mauldin Papers: Container 6 includes a letter from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to William Mauldin (WM) dated March 14, 1958; a copy of a letter from WM to ER dated March 11, 1958; a copy of a letter from WM to ER dated February 20, 1958.
--Lesley James McNair Papers: Container 2 includes a sympathy letter on McNair's death from Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Agnes Elizabeth Meyer Papers: Container 26 includes substantial correspondence between Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) and Agnes Meyer (AM) principally from 1955 to 1962. Copies of letters sent to ER. Some material dates from period after ER's death.
--James A. Michener Papers: Container 3 includes a letter from Elizabeth Ann Tucker to James Michener (JM) regarding his appearance on ER's radio show; May 17, 1951. Container 7 includes a copy of a typed note from ER to JM regarding the Asia Institute dated September 28, 1953.
--George Middleton Papers, 1894-1967, 36 ft. (ca. 13,000 items): Playwright, author, and copyright specialist. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Container 15 includes a note from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to George Middleton (GM) dated June 20, 1939; a letter from ER to GM dated May 15, 1939; a letter from ER to GM dated April 24, 1946; a letter from the secretary to ER to GM dated April 16, 1937; as well as invitations, placecards, and some copies of notes from GM to ER. Unpublished finding aid in the Library. Information on literary rights available in the Library.
--Charles Moore Papers: Container 11 includes a typed and signed note from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Charles Moore (CM) dated April 22, 1933; a typed and signed note from ER to CM dated April 24, 1933; a letter from the secretary to ER to CM dated April 10, 1935; a letter from the secretary to ER to CM dated October 18, 1935; a letter from the secretary to ER to CM dated December 6, 1935; a letter from the secretary to ER to CM dated January 23, 1936; a typed and signed note from ER to CM dated January 27, 1937; a letter from ER to CM dated February 15, 1937; a letter from the secretary to ER to CM dated May 4, 1937; and an invitation dated February 6, 1936.
--Merrill Moore Papers: Series C, Container 56 includes a note from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Merrill Moore (MM) thanking MM for a book dated January 9, 1950; and a letter from ER to Sumi Oura (secretary to MM) dated April 18, 1938 thanking her for an article.
--Henry Morgenthau Papers, 1795-1941, 30,000 ft.: Businessman and diplomat. Correspondence, diaries, articles, notes, reports, speeches, scrapbooks, clippings, maps, photos., memorabilia, and other materials relating to Morgenthau's early legal and business activities, his service as Ambassador to Turkey and as U.S. delegate to various foreign conferences. Correspondents include Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt. Container 11 includes a handwritten letter from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Henry Morgenthau (HM) conveying family news and thanks dated March 28, 1930; an handwritten letter from ER to HM conveying family news dated July 2, 1930; a typed note of acknowledgment from ER to HM dated May 6, 1931; an handwritten note from ER to HM dated August 2, 1935; a note of acknowledgment from ER to HM dated October 16, 1935; an invitation for dinner from ER to Mrs. Morgenthau dated January 22, 1936; a note from ER to HM thanking him for an anniversary gift dated April 17, 1937; a note from ER to Mrs. Morgenthau thanking her for a gift of pewter dated December 27, 1937; an handwritten letter addressed to 49 E. 65th St. from ER to HM dated September, 22; a handwritten letter regarding arrangements for HM's visit (address Executive Mansion, Albany, NY) from ER to HM dated April 3. Finding aid in the repository.
--National American Women Suffrage Association Papers: Container 26 includes a form letter from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) signed-UN Fund dated October 8, 1952; a form letter from ER signed-UN Fund dated October 25, 1951; a letter from the secretary of ER to Mrs. Guy Santial with reference to a copy of ER's speech dated February 22, 1944; a program: "Luncheon in honor of Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt" Boston Hotel Statler dated February 15, 1941; an article entitled "Liberal in this Year of Decision" by ER from The Christian Unitarian Register, vol. 127, no. 6 dated January 10, 1944; and some clippings on ER dated 1932-35 (5) and 1 undated from WWII era.
--National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Records, 1909-69, ca. 1,000,000 items, Partially restricted, Published guide: Organized in 1909 to work for equal treatment for Negroes, the Association adopted NAACP as its name in 1910. Correspondence of Eleanor Roosevelt is included. Series A, Container 512 (II) includes a typed and signed note from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Walter White dated February 24, 1944; a typed and signed note from ER to Walter White dated July 6, 1944; a typed and signed note from ER to Walter White dated June 17, 1944; a typed and signed letter from ER to Walter White dated August 8, 1944; a typed and signed note from ER to Walter White dated August 12, 1944; a typed and signed note from ER to Walter White dated October 6, 1944; a typed and signed note from ER to Walter White dated September 16, 1944; a typed and signed note from ER to Walter White dated October 11, 1944; typed and signed note from ER to Walter White dated December 13, 1944; a carbon of a letter on equality from ER to Mrs. Stallworth dated August 26, 1944. Other correspondence include letters from secretaries of ER to Walter White. Also includes carbons of letters from Walter White to ER. Also, I C73; II A144; III A31; III A203; IV A44 (WP search) Also, II A202, II A642, II A651, II A657, II G11, I C214, I C416, I G216; II B64, II B186 (UPA indexes-according to Randy Boehm, ER is also mentioned, but not indexed, in guide to Part 14).
--National Consumers League Papers: Container B21 includes 19 letters from Elizabeth S. Mague, M.C. Harrison, Lucy R. Mason, Emily Sims Marcontier, W.D. to Eleanor Roosevelt, regarding Fair Labor Standards Act, amending Social Security Act, minimum wage legislation, "Portal to Portal" issue, Equal Rights Amendment, Child Labor Amendment, as well as contributions to the League and condolences on death of FDR. February 15, 1933 - December 17, 1957. Also, 9 letters from Eleanor Roosevelt, mostly to Elizabeth S. Magee, regarding her contributions to the League, a radio contract, regrets and thank you's with dates ranging from 1933-1957. B27 includes a letter from Vera Waltman Mayer to Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) regarding dues dated June 29, 1959. B29 includes an acknowledgment from ER to Vera Mayer dated February 27, 1960; a letter from Vera Mayer to ER regarding ER's support of minimum wage improvements dated March 8, 1960; a letter from James Deakin to ER regarding ER's refusal of presidency of League dated January 25, 1961; a letter from James Deakin to ER regarding ER's resignation as vice president of League dated February 7, 1961; a letter from ER to Mrs. Mayer expressing thanks dated June 9, 1961. B16 includes a letter from John W. Edelman to ER dated May 28, 1958.
--National Women's Trade Union League of America Records, 1903-50, 11 ft.: Correspondence, records reports, and memorabilia. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. (Containers 5 through 10 were searched.) Container 6 includes clipping about possibility that Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) would attend NWTU conference, originally enclosed in letter dated January 11, 1935; a letter from ER to Rose Schneiderman regarding proposal to present a portrait of ER and plans for annual Christmas party (copy) dated August 12, 1935; a letter from Elisabeth Christman to ER regarding portrait dated August 23, 1935; a letter from ER to Elisabeth Christman again refusing portrait dated September 4, 1935. Container 7 includes a telegram from ER to Rose Schneiderman congratulating NWTU on its contributions to educating the public & station WEVD's contribution to free speech (copy) dated November 23, 1938. Unpublished finding aid in the library. Also described in the Library's Quarterly journal of current acquisitions, v. 8, no. 4 (Aug. 1951) p. 9-16.
--Victoria Henrietta (Kugler) Nesbitt Papers, 1933-49, 4 ft. (ca. 4500 items): Housekeeper and author. Correspondence, diaries; MSS. and galley proofs of Mrs. Nesbitt's two books, The presidential cookbook and White House Diary; a nearly complete file of White House menus (1933-45), an incomplete set of Franklin D. Roosevelt's daily appointment calendar (1934-45), memoranda of White House entertainments and other household matters and various recipes, lists and accounts kept while Mrs. Nesbitt was the Roosevelt's housekeeper. Includes correspondence with Eleanor Roosevelt and others on White House domestic affairs. Containers 1 and 2 include diaries (by year). Includes comments about activities of Roosevelts and their household. Container 3 includes 31 letters and telegrams from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Victoria Nesbitt (VN) dating from August 30, 1933 to September 11, 1946, plus 15 undated items. Most regard household accounts, arrangements and procedures. Of special note: letter which details procedures for handling mail and packages for ER dated August 22, 1939; letters which discuss validity of assertion in Pegler's newspaper column that FDR had not paid butcher bills dated August 26 & September 11, 1946. 30 letters and telegrams from VN to ER dating from 1933-1946. Most regard household arrangements and accounts. Also, letters and notes from Mary Campbell, Malvina Thompson, and "Tommy" on behalf of ER; telegrams and letters addressed to ER but forwarded to Nesbitt to handle (offers of service, supplies, etc.); copies of two notes from ER to Alva Long regarding household matters. Container 9 includes scattered notes from ER to HN; an invitation for E. Christman to attend conference on "Women on Policy-Making Commissions" at the White House dated June 14, 1944. Container 10 includes a program for dinner held in honor of ER dated May 9, 1946; a note of acknowledgment from ER dated May 13, 1946. Unpublished finding aid in the library. Information on literary rights available in the library.
--Albert Jay Nock Papers: References to Eleanor Roosevelt.
--John Callan O'Laughlin Papers: Listed in the First Ladies Index without description.
--J. Robert Oppenheimer Papers, 1927-67, 121 ft. (74,000 items): Physicist. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Container 62 includes a letter from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Robert Oppenheimer (RO) thanking him for his book, "The Open Mind" dated November 17, 1955; a telegram from ER to RO inviting him to Hyde Park dated May 23, 1959; a draft of an invitation from Mrs. RO to ER dated January 18, 1958; a telegram from ER to RO expressing regrets dated May 27, 1959; a copy of an invitation from Mrs. RO to ER dated January 18, 1958; an invitation from ER to RO dated October 15, 1957; a copy of a letter from RO to ER dated October 9, 1957; a copy of a letter from ER to RO regarding lunch with Niels Bohr dated October 3, 1957; a copy of a letter from Mrs. RO to ER dated June 3, 1956; a copy of a letter from the secretary to RO to ER dated April 29, 1954; a letter from ER to RO regarding H-Bombs dated April 16, 1954; a letter from ER to RO regarding lunch with National Issues Committee dated September 1, 1953; a letter from ER to RO dated May 25, 1950; a copy of a letter from RO to ER dated January 15, 1951, a letter from ER to RO accompanying a booklet entitled "William Reich Foundation on Orgonomy" dated January 11, 1951; a copy of a letter from RO to ER concerning Borderland Associates dated May 19, 1950; a note from ER to RO dated May 16, 1950; clippings from New York Herald Tribune: "Mrs Roosevelt's Line Tapped during WWII" dated November 1, 1965. Container 28V includes Clippings: (2 folders) on ER's television program. RO was a featured guest-topic: H Bomb (February 12, 1950). Finding aid in the Library. Open to investigators under restrictions accepted by the Library. Information on literary rights available in the Library.
--Winfred Overholser Papers: Container 1 includes a short note acknowledging reply to ER's letter regarding Mr. John Thompson from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Winfred Overholser (WO) dated January 6, 1954. (No evidence of the letter she mentions in "General Correspondence.")
--Garfield Bromley Oxnam Papers, 1823-1963, 55 ft. (16,000 items), In part, photocopies (positive) of ca. 130 letters in the possession of Mrs. Oxnam: Methodist clergyman and theologian. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Container C36 includes a letter of acknowledgment (photocopy) from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Garfield Bromley Oxnam (GBO) dated February 13, 1941; a photocopy of a letter acknowledging and expressing agreement with GBO about policies on food for Allies and for Germans from ER to GBO dated December 21, 1945; a note of acknowledgment from ER to GBO dated November 14, 1946; a telegram regarding Pastor Neimoeller from ER to GBO dated December 6, 1946; a carbon of a letter regarding Pastor Neimoeller from GBO to ER dated December 13, 1946; a letter regarding her meeting Pastor Neimoeller and expressing opinion that German people to blame for crimes of war from ER to GBO dated December 21, 1946; a letter expressing agreement with ER's position on responsibility of German people and explaining reason for inviting Neimoeller (carbon) from GBO to ER dated December 27, 1946; a brief note regarding Neimoeller's visit from ER to GBO dated April 15, 1947; a letter encouraging GBO to serve as delegate to Yugoslavia Cultural Congress from ER to GBO dated August 1, 1950; a note expressing regret at inability to participate in Yugoslavia Congress from GBO to ER dated August 15, 1950. Unpublished finding aid in the Library. Information on literary rights available in the Library.
--Robert Porter Patterson Papers: Container 44 includes a note with an enclosed letter from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Robert Porter Patterson (RPP) dated December 5, 1947; a note asking for donation to Wiltwyck School for Boys from ER to RPP dated May 12, 1950; a note with an enclosed letter from ER to RPP dated October 16, 1950; a copy regarding letter dated October 16, 1950 from RPP to ER dated October 20, 1950. Container 187 includes a memo regarding peanut soup from Mary McLeod Bethune from ER to FDR dated June 11, 1941.
--Waldo Pierce Papers: Container 7 includes a memo instructing ER to tell Bruce that he would like to have the Pierce watercolor, if offered from FDR to ER; a note accepting watercolor from ER to Bruce dated September 2, 1941.
--A. Philip Randolph Papers: Listed in the First Ladies Index without description.
--Joseph L. Rauh Papers: Listed in the First Ladies Index without description.
--
Donald Randall Richberg Papers: Container 2 includes a letter from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Donald Randall Richberg (DRR) regarding speaking engagements for current events course dated October 4, 1934; a letter from ER to DRR regarding article about negroes in Crisis dated October 10, 1934; a letter from ER to DRR regarding his comments on article in Crisis dated November 1, 1934; a letter from ER to DRR regarding treatment of Negroes by N.R.A. dated November 20, 1934; a letter from ER to DRR quoting letter from Walter White of NAACP about wage differential based on race dated November 22, 1934; a letter from ER to DRR regarding refusal of speaking engagement for teacher welfare organizations dated January 24, 1935; an acknowledgment from ER to DRR dated February 15, 1944.
--Lessing J. (Lessing Julius) Rosenwald Papers, 1819-1980, 28,000 items: Businessman and philanthropist. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Transfer from the Library's Rare Book and Special Collections Division, 1980-1983. Finding aid in the repository.
--Charles E. Russell Papers: Listed in the First Ladies Index without description.
--Socialist Party of America Papers: Micro, Index in Manuscript Division: Collection includes a letter from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to fellow Guild member dated March 8, 1946; a letter to ER from L. Cohn dated July 5, 1940; a letter from L. Cohn to ER dated October, 1946; a letter from L. Cohn to ER dated November 4; a letter to ER from I. Feinberg dated January 20, 1947; a letter to ER from I. Feinberg dated February 4, 1947; a letter to ER from I. Feinberg dated February 20, 1947; a letter from ER to I. Feinberg dated October 10, 1947; a letter to ER from P. Heller dated March 9, 1949. Part 2 includes a letter to ER from R. Tucker dated February 24, 1961; a letter from ER to R. Tucker dated March 2, 1961; a letter to ER from Irwin Suall dated January 19, 1960; a letter from ER to Irwin Suall dated July 22, 1960.
--Society of Women Geographers Papers: Listed in the First Ladies Index without description.
--Wesley Winans Stout Papers, 1913-54, ca. 600 items: Editor. Chiefly correspondence of Stout as associate editor (1924-36) and editor (1937-42) of the Saturday Evening Post, of his predecessor, George H. Lorimer, and other members of the Post editorial staff. Principal correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Container 3 includes a letter from Wesley Stout (WS) to George T. Bye concerning his intention to write a play called "Mrs. Roosevelt Slept Here" dated June 24, 1941; a note from ER to George T. Bye stating her amusement at letter of WS dated July 10, 1941. Unpublished finding aid in the Library.
--Clarence Streit Papers: Container 32 is referenced in the First Ladies Index.
--Cora de la Matyr Thomas Paper: Iincludes a letter from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Cora de la Matyr Thomas (CT) dated December 8, 1934.
--William Dearl Thomas Papers: Includes an undated autograph card.
--Charles P. Tuft Papers: Container I:65 includes a folder labelled "Roosevelt, Franklin D. and Eleanor."
--United Nations Palestine Partition Papers: Listed in the First Ladies Index without description.
--Irita Van Doren Papers: Container 7 includes a typed and signed note from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Irita Van Doren (IVD) dated November 20, 1937; a typed and signed note from ER to IVD dated December 10, 1958.
--Henry Agard Wallace Papers: Listed in the First Ladies Index without description.
--William Allen White Papers: Container 399 includes a letter from the secretary to ER acknowledging receipt of WAW's son's book dated October 27, 1942.
--Roy Wilkins Papers: Container 30 included a NAACP series-folder labelled "Roosevelt, Eleanor, 1949-50."
--Theodore Stark Wilkinson Papers, 1942-45, ca. 200 items, Forms part of the Library's Naval Historical Foundation collection, In part, transcripts (typewritten): Naval officer. A visit by Eleanor Roosevelt is recorded.
--Charl Ormond Williams Papers, 1924-59, ca. 3200 items: Educator. Correspondence, memoranda, telegrams, reports, newspaper clippings, and printed material, chiefly 1935-45, relating to Williams' association with the National Education Association and work in the field of education and educational reform, including her participation in the 1944 White House Conference on Rural Education. Correspondence is chiefly with Eleanor Roosevelt. 3 Containers. Chiefly correspondence of Williams to ER over the period of 1936 to 1959. Chiefly letters to ER with replies from ER. His letters are quite lengthy. Unpublished finding aid in the repository.
--Edith (Bolling) Galt Wilson Papers, 1833-1961, 27 ft. (ca. 19,000 items): Wife of Woodrow Wilson, President of the United States (1856-1924). Container 30 includes 20 letters, notes, invitations from Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) to Edith Bolling Wilson (EBW) covering the period from 1928 to 1961. Also includes copies of 11 letters from EBW to ER for the same period. Of note are several letters from ER to EBW asking her support of the Democratic National Advisory Committee in 1928--which EBW refused. EBW also occasionally made notations on the outcome of events or situations described in the letters. Several programs to events honoring ER are included; of particular interest is the program to the White Elephant Tea at the Sulgrave Club, April 12, 1945. ER attended but was called away not long after her arrival as FDR had been stricken with a fatal hemorrhage. Unpublished finding aid in the Library.
--Woodrow Wilson Papers: Listed in the First Ladies Index without description.
--Women's Joint Congressional Committee Papers: Container 10 includes "Expenses for Roosevelt dinner." Also, includes program, proceedings, bills and receipts for dinner in honor of Eleanor Roosevelt, March 14, 1946.
National Archives and Records Service, Washington, D.C.:
--Office of Civilian Defense
(RG 171) Records, 1939-45, 606 cu. ft., Open, Published and unpublished guides: The Office, which was established in May 1920 and terminated in June 1945, coordinated federal, state, and local defense relationships regarding the protection of civilians during air raids and other emergencies. The division of federal-state cooperation contains miscellaneous records (10 in.) with memoranda to Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Work Projects Administration (RG 69) Records, 1933-45, 4637 cu. ft., Open, Published and unpublished guides: The CWA, FERA, and WPA central files is the FERA "old" general series, 1933-35 (34 ft.), which contains material on women's camps; the 1933 White House conference on emergency needs of women, over which Eleanor Roosevelt presided.
Moorland-Spingarn Research Center, Howard University, Washington, D.C.:
--Marian Anderson and the DAR Controversy, Records, 1939-45, 9 ft. and microfilm reels, Open, Unpublished guide: Material resulting from denial of permission to (Miss) Anderson (1902-), a contralto, to present a concert in April 1939 in Constitution Hall in Washington. Correspondence, reports, broadsides, programs, press releases, and clippings relating to the Marian Anderson Citizens Committee formed to protest the action and to the Marian Anderson Mural Fund Committee. The Citizens Committee was endorsed in letters from Eleanor Roosevelt.
--United States, Work Projects Administration Records, 1934-1951, 8 ft., Chiefly transcripts (typewritten): Records from the office of Alfred Edgar Smith, Jr. (b. 1903), administrative assistant and race relations officer, 1934-1943, relating chiefly to the status and participation of blacks in the WPA; and other correspondence and writings of Smith. Includes letters to President and Mrs. Roosevelt. Register in the repository.

 

Business and Professional Women’s Foundation Archives, Washington, D.C.:
--Records: ca. 300 tapes, Open, Unpublished guide: The Foundation was formed in 1956 to advance the status of women; to administer educational scholarships, loans, and grants for research on women/ and to conduct seminars. Includes interviews with Eleanor Roosevelt, as well as speeches or addresses by her.

 

Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of American History, Washington, D.C.:
--Department of Public Programs, 1984, 11 pages: Typescript of Eleanor Roosevelt Centenary bibliography by Barbara H. Kemp.

 

Columbia University Libraries, New York, New York:
--Edward Clark Carter Papers, 1851-1960, ca. 5600 items: Educator and officer of Young Men's Christian Associations (1902-1922) and Institute of Pacific Relations (1926-1948); and chairman; Russian War Relief (1941-1945). Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Henry Lehman Papers, 1895-1963, ca. 1,250,000 items, In part, microfilm (150 reels, positive) made from originals in the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, NY, and New York State Library, Albany: Governor and U.S. Senator from New York. Includes an oral history from Eleanor Roosevelt talking about Lehman. Eleanor Roosevelt is also a correspondent of Lehman. Description published by the School of International Affairs, Columbia University, 1968.
--James G. McDonald Papers, 1909-64, 20 ft., Open, Unpublished guide: Papers of McDonald (1886-1964), a journalist and diplomat who was League of Nations high commissioner for refugees and the first US ambassador to Israel, includes correspondence of Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Charles Poletti Papers, 1921-75, 28 ft., Open, Unpublished guide: Papers of Poletti (1903-), a politician, lawyer, and US Army officer, includes correspondence of Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Greenberg Publisher Records, 1900-1976, ca. 49,000 items: Founded 1924 in New York, NY, and Jacob W. and David B. Greenberg. Editorial, production, contract, and publicity files concerning the publication of "how to" books, westerns, and books on agriculture, cooking, health, police techniques, theater, and other topics. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Marion Edwena Kenworthy Papers, 1915-1980, ca. 16,000 items: Professor of psychiatry, New York School of Social Work. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Marie (Mattingly) Meloney Papers, 1891-1943, 4700 items: Correspondence of Mrs. Meloney while she was editor of the "Delineator," the Sunday magazine of the "New York Herald Tribune," and "This Week Magazine" covering a wide field of interest. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.
--National Emergency Civil Liberties Committee Records, 1951-68, ca. 8500 items: Correspondence, printed matter, clippings, and other papers relating to the committee's activities in mobilizing public opinion in support of academic freedom, civil rights and the rights of travel. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Frances Perkins Papers, 1908-63, ca. 49,500 items: U.S. Secretary of Labor. Correspondence, mss. of writings, speeches, articles, photos, and pamphlets, chiefly during Perkins' Cabinet service, 1933-45. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Dorothy (Reuben) Rosenman Papers, 1936-46, ca. 250 items: Housing analyst. Correspondence, documents, printed copies of Mrs. Rosenman's articles, and other printed material relating to her career.
--L.S. Alexander Gumby Collection, ca. 1800-1960, 16 boxes and 161 vols., Open, Unpublished guide: Collection, which was compiled by Gumby (1885-1961), concerns African-American life in the United States. Clippings deal with Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Algernon David Black Papers, ca. 1932-75, ca. 14,000 items, Open, Unpublished guide: Writer, lecturer, and leader of the New York Society for Ethical Culture. His female correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.
--James Oliver Brown Papers, ca. 1927-70, 87,000 items, Access restricted, Unpublished guide: Papers of Brown, a literary agent, and his predecessor George T. Bye include letters and manuscripts of Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Columbia University Oral History Collection, New York, New York:
--Marion Dickerman Oral History, 1971,345-page transcript, Access restricted, Published guide: Interview with Dickerman (1890-), an educator, concerns her friendship with Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt; reminiscences of Hyde Park, Campobello, and Warm Springs; Eleanor Roosevelt's childhood and her interest in woman's suffrage and West Virginia mine workers; and the deaths of the Roosevelts.
--Anna (Roosevelt) Halsted, Oral History, 1973, 2 tapes and 55-page transcript, Access restricted, Index: Halsted (1906-75), the daughter of Franklin Delano And Eleanor Roosevelt, describes her childhood in Hyde Park, family life and relationships, family associates, the years when her father was governor of New York, Yalt, and Franklin D., Eleanor, Sara, and Elliot Roosevelt.
--Anna Roosevelt Halsted Oral History, 1979, New York, New York, Part 4, no. 93, 1 microfiche: The reminiscences of Anna Roosevelt Halsted.
--Herbert H. Lehman Project, Oral History, 1959, 1184 pp., Partially restricted, Published guide: Transcripts of interviews with Lehman, a businessman and New York senator, and with persons who were closely associated with him through various stages of his career, including Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Oral History Collection, Miscellany, No size given, Partially closed, Published guide: A number of interviews in the Oral History Collection pertain to women although the participants are not women. There are comments on Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Frances Perkins Oral History, 1976, Part 3, no. 182, 9 books (61 microfiche): The reminiscences of Frances Perkins.
--Dorothy (Reuben) Rosenman Oral History, 1976, 2 tapes and 65-page transcript, Open, Index: Rosenman, who was active in housing reform during the 1930s and 1940s, discusses among other things, her political and social contacts which includes Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Social Security Oral History, 1965-68, 10,649 pp., Partially closed, Published guide: The origins and early years of Social Security and Medicare are described in tapes and transcripts of interviews with persons involved. Katherine Fredrica Lenroot, a social worker who was employed by the Children's Bureau beginning in 1915, gives her impressions of persons including Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Kroch Library,Cornell University, Ithaca, New York:
--Scrapbooks of Roland and Emily Elkus Crangle, 1898-1955, 4 v., 1.8 cu. ft.: Scrapbooks of Crangle, a lawyer of Buffalo, NY, and his wife Emily Elkus Crangle ((b. 1878), both of whom were prominent in the social and political life of the Buffalo area. Includes a few letters from Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Edith M. Ellis Scrapbooks, 1924-33, 2 v.: Scrapbooks containing correspondence, clippings, and other papers relating to Mrs. Ellis's activities in the Democratic State Committee, the Democratic Union, the New York Federation of Women's Clubs and other organizations. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.
--State College of Home Economics Records, 1877-1966, ca. 45 cu. ft., Open, Published and unpublished guides: Contains records of the College as well as of the New York State Federation of Home Bureaus. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Flora Rose Papers, 1923-53, 6.25 ft. and 1 tape, Open, Published and unpublished guides: Interview with (Miss) Rose (1874-1959), a professor and director of the New York State College of Home Economics, in which she reminisces about the establishment and growth of the college of home economics at Cornell and comments on the contributions of persons including Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Frank Sullivan Papers, 1913-64, ca. 9 ft. (ca. 900 items), In part, transcripts (typewritten): Author and humorist. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Card catalog in the library.

 

Syracuse University Library, Syracuse, New York:
--William Stiles Bennnet Papers, 1898-1959, , ca. 17 ft.: Lawyer, State legislator, and U.S. Representative from New York. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished register and announcement in the library.
--James Earle and Laura Gardin Fraser Papers, 1895-1967, 63 ft.: Sculptor. Correspondents include Grace Coolidge and Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished inventory in the library. Open to investigators under restrictions accepted by the library.
--Fremont Rider Correspondence, 1831-1953, 383 items: Librarian, editor, author, and inventor. Includes letters collected by Rider as well as his own correspondence. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Dorothy Thompson Papers, 1917-61, 75 ft.: Journalist. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Inventory available in the library. Open to investigators under restrictions accepted by the library. Information on literary rights available in the library.

 

Albany Institute of History and Art Library, Albany, New York:
--Huybertie Lansing (Pruya) Hamlin Papers, 1878-1957, 46 boxes and 60 vols., Open, Partial unpublished guide: Author of numerous articles abut life in Albany and about the social class of which she was a member. Also contains photos, clippings about Eleanor Roosevelt and about Franklin Roosevelt's political career, invitations to White House functions, and political pamphlets.

 

American Foundation for the Blind, New York, New York:
--Helen Adams Keller Papers, 1887-, 71,500 items, Access restricted, Unpublished guide: Keller (1880-1968) was a deaf and blind author, lecturer, and counselor on national and international relations for the American Foundation for the Blind and the American Foundation for the Overseas Blind. Included are papers on Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

General Theological Seminary, St. Mark's Library, New York, New York:
--Bishop W.T. Manning Papers, 1846-1954, 71 boxes, Open, Unpublished guide: Manning (1866-1949) was bishop of the Episcopal archdiocese of New York from 1921 to 1946. Includes correspondence with Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Tamiment Library, New York University, New York, New York:
--Rose Schneiderman Papers, 1904-1967: 5 boxes. Feminist and union leader. Includes clippings on Schneiderman, Eleanor Roosevelt, and the women's trade union movement. Also, correspondence with Mrs. Roosevelt.

 

University of Rochester Library, Rochester, New York:
--Louis Wiley Papers, 1861-1954, 15 ft.: Journalist. Correspondence and other papers. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Partial card index to letters. Described in the University of Rochester Library bulletin, v. 9, no. 1 (Autumn 1953) p. 1-11. Information on literary rights available in the library.

 

The Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley, California:
--Gelett Burgess Papers, ca. 1873-1951, 5 boxes, 6 cartons, 1 portfolio, and 2 microfilm reels, Open, Key: Writer. Papers of Burgess (1866-1951) include correspondence with Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Hiram Warren Johnson Papers, ca. 1895-1945, 145 boxes and 49 cartons, Open, Key: Papers of Johnson (1866-1945) relate primarily to his career as governor of California from 1911 to 1917 and as US senator from California from 1917 to 1945 and to his leadership of the Progressive party and include a subject file on women's suffrage and correspondence from Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Robert Walker Kenny Papers, 1920-47, 41 boxes and 16 cartons, Open, Key: Papers of Walder (1901-76) relate primarily to his career as attorney general of California from 1942 to 1946. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Davidson Library,University of California, Santa Barbara, California:
--Rom Landau Correspondence, 1927-66, 152 items: Author, professor, sculptor, and specialist in Islamic culture. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Donald Cultross Peattie Papers, 1921-65, ca. 15,500 items: Naturalist, author, and editor. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Catalogued in the library. Information on literary rights available in the library.

 

Hoover Institution on War, Revolution, and Peace, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California:
--Nym Wales Papers, 1931-54, 37 ms. boxes and 30 items, Access restricted, Unpublished guide: Correspondence, writings, speeches, interviews, photos, organizational records, reports, memoranda, and other papers of Helen Foster Snow (1907-), a journalist and writer whose pseudonym is Nym Wales. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Stanford University Libraries, Manuscripts Division, Palo Alto, California:
--Noted Women Collection.Women's Papers, ca. 1884-1939, ca. 60 items: Correspondence, pamphlets, and autographs of and about noted women. Persons represented include Eleanor Roosevelt. Open register. Unpublished guides in the library. Information on literary rights available in the library.

 

Jacob Rader Marcus Center, American Jewish Archives, Cincinnati, Ohio:
--Annie (Nathan) Meyer Papers, 1890-1950, 80 items and 20 boxes, 10.4 ft.: A New York City social activist and writer, (1867-1951) helped found Barnard College, the first women's college in the city; she also was active in the antisuffrage movement and the WWI home economics movement. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Open to investigators under restriction accepted by the repository.

 

Oberlin College Archives, Oberlin, Ohio:
--Charles A. (Charles Adams) Mosher Papers, 1836-1982, 1 ft., In part, photocopies: Editor and publisher, Oberlin News-Tribune, and U.S. representative from Ohio. Contains material relating to visits by Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland, Ohio:
--Florence Ellinwood Allen Papers, 1856-1967, 14 ft.: Lawyer and judge, of . Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Register in the repository.

 

Wright State University, Columbus, Ohio:
--James M. Cox Papers, 1913-60, 20 ft., Open, No guide: Newspaper publisher, member of the US House of Representatives, Ohio governor, and Democratic presidential candidate in 1920. Includes letter from Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Pennsylvania State Archives, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania:
--J. Horace McFarland Papers, 1859-1951, 20 cu. ft., Open, Published and unpublished guides: Papers of McFarland (1859-1948), a conservationist who conducted campaigns for the preservation of Niagara Falls and national parks, primarily relate to his work with the American Civic Association and related associations. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Gertrude Howard (Olmsted) Nauman Papers, 1780-1972, 11 cu. ft., Open, Published guide and inventory: A politician, civic leader, and public official who was married to attorney Spencer G. Nauman. Also contains political papers of her father Marlin E. Olmsted (1847-1913), a Republican congressman, and correspondence with his wife Gertrude (Howard) Olmsted McCormick (1874-1953), who was national vice-president of the Girl Scouts of America and an organizer of the Harrisburg Symphony and the Harrisburg Art Association. Correspondents of Gertrude McCormick include Lou Hoover and Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Temple University Libraries Urban Archives, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania:
--American Civil Liberties Union, Greater Philadelphia Branch, Records, 1948-66 & Addition, 1960-65, 1 ft.: Records from the executive director's files relating to sexual discrimination, House Committee on Un-American Activities, Juvenile Court, Philadelphia's magisterial system, censorship, legal rights, and loyalty oaths. Names represented include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished description in the library.
--Americans for Democratic Action, Southeastern Pennsylvania Chapter, Records, 1947-67, 15 ft.: Correspondence, minutes, membership lists, newsletters, and campaign and publicity materials relating to political issues, elections, red-baiting, revision of the Pennsylvania constitution, voter education, civil rights, municipal government, and municipal home rule, particularly in the Philadelphia area. Persons represented include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished finding aid in the repository.

 

Oregon Historical Society, Portland, Oregon:
--Americana Collection, , No size given, Open, Card catalog: Correspondence and manuscript material include 1946 correspondence of Marion T. Weatherford with Eleanor Roosevelt and Senator Wayne Morse concerning labor strikes.
--Nan (Wood) Honeyman Papers, 1900-65, 9 v. and 1 box: U.S. Representative from Oregon, state senator, and government official. Correspondence, speeches, voting records, abstracts, mementos of Democratic Party conventions, scrapbooks relating to Franklin D. Roosevelt, and documents relating to Mrs. Honeyman's terms as Oregon customs collector. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt and other leading Democrats.

 

University of Oregon Library, Eugene, Oregon:
--Jerome Davis Papers, 1915-63, 17 ft.: Educator and sociologist. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Inventory in the library.
--Nan (Wood) Honeyman Political correspondence, 1932-50, Portland, Oregon, 1 ft, 114 items: U.S. Representative from Oregon. Correspondence concerning rivers and harbors improvement and political campaigns. Includes personal notes from Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Nan (Wood) Honeyman Papers, 1900-65, Eugene, Oregon, 1 box and 9 vols., Open, Card catalog: Honeyman (1881-1970) was Oregon state senator from 1934 to 1936, a US congresswoman for one term beginning in 1936, and customs collector from 1942 to 1953. Personal correspondence, including letters from Eleanor Roosevelt and leading Democratic party figures.
--John MacLean Redding Papers, 1943-63, 3 ft.: Author and publicist. Minor correspondence and mss. of six books. Includes a series of notes (1958-59) from Eleanor Roosevelt concerning "right-to-work" laws when Redding was chairman of the National Council for Industrial Peace. Inventory with the collection.

 

Schlesinger Library,Radcliffe College, Cambridge, Massachusetts:
--Mary Anderson Papers, 1921-50, 4 boxes: Director of the U.S. Women's Bureau. Personal letters and other papers accumulated by Miss Anderson while director of the Women's Bureau and following her retirement in 1944. Papers relate to the Consumer's League, the Daughters of the American Revolution, equal rights for women, the International Federation of Working Women, the National Women's Trade Union League, and the U.S. Women in Industry Service. Persons figuring prominently in the papers include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished inventory in the library.
--Florence Arzelia Armstrong Papers, 1901-61, 3 v. and 3 boxes: Economist. Correspondence with personal friends and about club activities; articles on the cost of living, problems of the aged, and the status of women; and material relating to various organizations such as the Washington, DC branch of the American Association of University Women, the Business and Professional Women's Club of Washington, the National Women's Party, and the American Dietetic Association. Persons mentioned include Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Mary and Barry Bingham Papers, 1929-1955, 3 boxes and 1 carton, The repository also has photocopies of the collection: Includes material concerning the Democratic Party, especially in Kentucky, Kentucky social life and customs, and Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt.
--Florence Ledyard (Cross) Kitchelt Papers, 1885-1956, 10 boxes: Social worker and feminist. Diary (1918) and other papers relating to Mrs. Kitchelt's work among the immigrants in New York City and Rochester, NY, her work for suffrage in Rochester and in Connecticut, her work as executive director of the Connecticut League of Nations Association and as chairman of the Connecticut Committee for the Equal Rights Amendment. Persons represented include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished inventory in the library.
--Dorothy Kirchwey Brown Papers, 1920s-72, 22 Hollinger boxes, 3 folders, 3 cartons, 1 vol., and 1 oversize item, Open, No guide: (Mrs. LaRue) Brown (1888-), a Democratic party member, has worked for the social improvement of women and children. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Florence L. Harrison Papers 1885-1973, 1 folder, Open, Published and unpublished guides: Harrison (1883-1973) was an educator who was active in women's organizations such as the LWV, LWV's Overseas Educational Fund, and the Service Bureau for Women's Organizations. Includes items regarding Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Gladys Webster Jones Papers, 1929-39, 1 folder, Open, Unpublished guide: Correspondence, play, and speeches of Jones (1891-), who worked with the AAUW, attempted to establish a local branch in Washington, DC, of the World Center for Women's Archives, and who was associated with the Employment Service of the US Department of Labor. Material also pertains to Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Freda Kirchwey Papers, 1890-1972, 22 boxes, 18 folders, and 1 reel of microfilm: Journalist and editor of The Nation. Includes correspondence and other administrative papers (mainly after 1933), documenting her career as editor and publisher of The Nation. Some relate to issues on which the periodical focused, particularly the rise of fascism in Europe, New Deal, political consequences of World War II, Roosevelt's attempt to pack the Supreme Court, abandonment of isolationism in favor of collective security in the late 1930's, and postwar anticommunism. Persons represented include Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Eleanor Roosevelt. Access to personal papers restricted. Unpublished finding aid in the repository.
--Harriet (Burton) Laidlaw Papers, 1886-1948, 10 boxes: Feminist. Correspondence, articles, and other papers relating to Mrs. Laidlaw's youth, education, her work as a teacher, her marriage, family affairs, and interest in the white slavery traffic, woman suffrage, and many social, musical, and philanthropic activities. Persons mentioned include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished inventory in the library.
--Alma Lutz Papers, 1937-53, & Addition, 1921-46, ca. 3 ft.: Author. Correspondence, minutes, articles, financial reports, copies of legislation, press releases, printed material, clippings, and photos (chiefly 1930-45), relating to Miss Lutz's work with the National Woman's Party. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Information on literary rights available in the library. The library also has transcripts (typewritten) of some of the correspondence.
--Jeannette Rankin Papers, 1879-1976, 13 boxes, 5 reels of phonotape, and 1 reel of motion picture film: U.S. Representative from Montana. Bulk of the material relates to Rankin's congressional career and her activities on behalf of peace women's suffrage. Persons represented include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished finding aid in the repository.
--Mary Kingsbury Simkhovitch Papers, 1852-1959, 6 boxes and 8 folders: Settlement worker and social economist, of New York, NY. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Finding aid published in Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America, the Manuscript Inventories, Catalogs of the Manuscripts, Books and Periodicals (1984).
--Edith G. Stedman Papers, 1833-1971, 8.5 Hollinger boxes and 12 folders, Open, Published and unpublished guides: Stedman (ca. 1888-) was director of the Radcliffe College Appointment Bureau. Correspondence, including letters from Margaret Delano and Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Sue Shelton White Papers, 1913-43, 1959, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 4 boxes: Lawyer and suffragette. Includes material related to Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished inventory in the library.
Massachusetts Historical Society Library, Boston, Massachusetts:
--August Belmont Papers, 1827-1965, ca. 1000 items, in part, transcripts (typewritten) of translations: Financier, of New York. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished guide in the library.

 

Healey Library,University of Massachusetts, Boston, Massachusetts:
--W.E.B. Du Bois Papers, 1885-1964, ca. 140 ft., Closed, No guide: Primarily correspondence of Du Bois (1868-1963), an author, sociologist, historian, and a founder of the NAACP and editor of its journal The Crisis from 1910 to 1934. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Mugar Memorial Library, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts:
--Martha Gellhorn Papers, 1920's-65, , ca. 300 items, 17 boxes: Journalist and author. Includes letters from Eleanor Roosevelt. Access restricted. Inventory available in the library.

 

Harvard Law School Library, Cambridge, Massachusetts:
--William Henry Hastie Papers, 1916-1976, 74 ft. (ca. 39,000 items): Government official and judge. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Amherst College Library, Amherst, Massachusetts:
--Harrison Griswold Dwight Papers, 1902-59, 9.5 ft., Open, Unpublished guide: Author and critic. Includes correspondence with Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Smith College Library, Northampton, Massachusetts:
--Ethel Eyre Valentine Dreier Papers, 1902-57,ca. 4 ft.: Civic leader, lecturer, and writer of newspaper columns, pamphlets, and brochures. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Card catalog in library.

 

Wallace Library, Wheaton College, Norton, Massachusetts:
--Women's Education Collection, 1834-, 192 ft., 500 vols., 14 recording discs, and 75 tapes, Open, Unpublished guide: Records of Wheaton College, a women's school founded in 1834 as Wheaton female Seminary. Includes tapes of a forum held in 1962 with Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

American Jewish Historical Society, Waltham, Massachusetts:
--Phillips Family Papers, 1773-1954, 4 ft., Open, Catalog card: Includes papers of Rosalie (Solomons) Phillips (1872-1945) which illustrate her acquaintance with Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan:
--Robert Cooley Angell Papers, 1923-71, 3 ft.: Professor of sociology, University of Michigan. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished finding aid in the repository.
--Read Bain Papers, 1893-1973, 12 ft.: Professor of sociology at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio; vice president of American Sociological Society; editor-in-chief of American Sociological Review; president of Sociological Research Association' and poetry editor of The Humanist. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished finding aid in the repository.
--Emerson Richard Boyles Papers, 1879-1960, 9 ft. and 11 v.: Lawyer and justice of the Michigan Supreme Court. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Michael Church Papers, 1934-56,1 ft.: Assistant director of the Extension Service of the University of Michigan. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.
--William Haber Papers, 1925-77, 40 ft.: Labor economist, professor of economics and dean at University of Michigan, and board member of organizations concerned with Jewish affairs. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished finding aid in the repository. Access restricted.
--Harlan Henthorne Hatcher Papers, 1931-67, 70 ft.: Historian, professor of English and vice president of Ohio State University, and president of University of Michigan. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished finding aid in the repository.
--Arthur Jay Lacy Papers, 1891-1975, 9 ft., Addition to: Arthur Jay Lacy Papers, 1913-64: Lawyer and judge, of Detroit, Mich. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished finding aid in the repository.
--Margaret Bayne Price Papers, 1918-69, 25 ft.: Democratic National Committeewoman from Michigan, vice-chair, Democratic National Committee, and director of women's affairs of the Democratic Party. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished finding aid in the repository.
--Arthur Hendrick Vandenberg Papers, 1915-51, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 8 ft. and 24 v.: U.S. Senator from Michigan. Correspondence, diaries, and scrapbooks, detailing Vandenberg's political career as Republican Senator, chairman of Senate Foreign Relations Committee, and delegate to the United Nations Conference, San Francisco, 1945. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished finding aid in the repository.

 

Walter P. Reuther Library, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan:
--Michigan AFL-CIO Collection, 1939-58, 103 ft.: Correspondence, reports, minutes, resolutions, notes, court decisions, proceedings, press releases, financial records, published material, and newspaper clippings of the Michigan State AFL-CIO and Michigan CIO Council. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished inventory in the repository. Information on literary rights available in the repository.
--Michigan AFL-CIO Lansing Office Collection, 1930-63, 19 ft.: Reference files, chiefly 1952-56, consisting primarily of correspondence, legislative records, biographical information, voting records, press releases and clippings, notes on individuals, unions, organizations, Michigan State departments and agencies, topics of contemporary interest, and elected and appointed local, State, and national officials, collected at the Lansing office of the Michigan CIO Council and Michigan State AFL-CIO. Includes material relating to Eleanor Roosevelt. Papers less than 20 years old are closed to investigators.

National Federation of Press Women, Blue Springs, Missouri:


--Archives, Records, 1937-, 1 cabinet, 39 vols., and 3 microfilm reels, Access restricted, No guide: The section titled "Issues of Press Women" contains information on Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

University of Missouri Library, St. Louis, Missouri:
--Phil M. Donnelly Papers, 1944-57, 8235 folders, 17 boxes, Open, Unpublished guide: Gubnatorial files and departmental correspondence of Donnelly (1891-1961). Includes material regarding Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Margaret Hickey Papers, 1928-76, 25 ft., Open, Unpublished guide: A lawyer, businesswoman, and senior public affairs editor of Ladies Home Journal, Hickey (1902-) served on several federal committees. Includes letters from Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Homer Price Rainey Papers, 1919-52, 3 v. and 1964 folders, 116 items: Educator. Correspondence, lecture notes, speeches, radio addresses, articles, and personal papers covering Rainey's career in the fields of teaching, research, administration, and religion. Correspondence with Eleanor Roosevelt about the Youth Commission. Open to investigators under restrictions accepted by the library.

 

West Virginia University Library, Morgantown, West Virginia:
Arthurdale Homestead Project Papers, 1933-39, 1 ft., 2 boxes, 2 folders, 1 reel of microfilm, and 3 reels of moving picture film: Initiated by Eleanor Roosevelt in 1934, the project sought to resettle and retrain unemployed miners and laborers for farm work. Correspondence, newspaper clippings, printed material, and pictorial material covering the beginning and development of the resettlement project of Arthurdale, WV. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Congress of Industrial Organizations, Industrial Union Councils, 1939-51, 51 boxes: Correspondence, legal papers, reports, and printed material. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Congress of Industrial Organizations, Secretary-Treasurer's Office records, 1935-60, ca. 121 ft.: Correspondence, reports, minutes, proceedings, congressional testimony, resolutions, election returns, speeches, press releases, financial statements, published material, and newspaper clippings, from the files of James Barron Carey, secretary-treasurer and civil rights director (1945-58). Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished finding aid in the repository.

 

Atlanta History Center, Atlanta, Georgia:
--Records, 1957-1963, ca. 2 cu. ft.: Established 1957 as Help Our Public Education. Includes letters from Eleanor Roosevelt to Muriel Lokey.

 

Atlanta University Center Archives, Atlanta, Georgia:
--Southern Conference for Human Welfare Records, 1938-67, 15,478 items, Open, Unpublished guide: Official files of the Conference later known as the Southern Conference Educational Fund. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Emory University Library, Atlanta, Georgia:
--Dorothy (Rogers) Tilly Papers, 1868-1970, 562 items: Church and civil rights worker, of Atlanta, GA. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished finding aids in the repository. Information on literary rights available in the repository.

 

Georgia Department of Archives and History, Atlanta, Georgia:
Atlanta League of Women Voters Records, 1894-1972, 18 cu. ft. and 1 folder, Open, Partial inventory: Includes speeches of Eleanor Roosevelt

 

Georgia Historical Society, Savannah, Georgia:
--Eleanor Roosevelt Papers, 1940, 1 item, Open, Unpublished guide: Letter in which Roosevelt states to William S. Rockwell that her visit to a Civilian Conservation Corps camp in Yosemite was pleasant.

 

Hargrett Library,University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia:
--Emily Barnelia Woodward Papers, 1916-57, , 1769 items, Open, Unpublished guide: Woodward (1885-1970) was a journalist and newspaper editor. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Newark Public Library, Newark, New Jersey:
--Autographs Collection, ca. 1750s-1950s, 712 items, Open, No guide: Correspondence and other papers of persons prominent in history, politics, and the arts, particularly in New Jersey. Includes material of Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Herbert Hoover Presidential Library, West Branch, Iowa:
--James Westbrook Pegler Papers, 1908-69, 63 ft., Open, Unpublished guide: A nationally syndicated newspaper columnist. Included are files on Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Iowa State Historical Society, Iowa City, Iowa:
--Flora (Cotton) Etter Papers, 1894-1936, 6 folders, Open, Published guide: Correspondence of (Mrs. W.L.) Etter, a Democratic National Committee member from Sigourney, IA, includes letters from President Franklin D. Roosevelt and his wife Eleanor Roosevelt extending invitations to Etter from White House and other official functions.

 

University of Iowa Libraries, Iowa City, Iowa:
--Calvin Benham Baldwin Papers, 1933-75, 30 ft.: Government official and national secretary of the Progressive Party. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished inventory in the repository.

 

American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming:
--Harry Barnard B. Letzky Papers, 1925-1977, 32 ft.: Biographer, publicist, and columnist. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Louis B. Cella, Franklin D. Roosevelt Collection, 1930-72, 175 ft., Forms part of the repository's Archive of Contemporary History collection, In part, transcripts: Chiefly printed material, including articles, speeches, appraisals and other writings, pamphlets, documents, periodicals, clippings, books and booklets, posters, book reviews, tributes and memorials, newsletters, and recordings, relating to Franklin D. Roosevelt, with some material relating to Eleanor Roosevelt, together with Cella's correspondence pertaining to his collection. Unpublished finding aid in the repository.
--Mary Josephine Hornaday Papers, 1929-70, 2 ft., Forms part of the repository's Archives of Contemporary History collection open, Accession list: Journalist. Includes correspondence and other material relating to her father, James Hornaday, and to Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished finding aid in the repository. Hornaday (1906-) did volunteer work in Europe during WWII. Correspondence with her mother from the period when Hornaday was in Europe and letters from Eleanor Roosevelt from 1942 to 1946. Also, includes invitations from Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Selena Royle Papers, 1930-73, 1 Hollinger box, Open, Accession list: Royle was an author and theatrical and film personality until she retired to Mexico in the 1940s. Includes letters from Eleanor Roosevelt in 1952.
--Eugene L. Vidal Papers, 1924-69, 14 ft., Forms part of the repository's Transportation History Foundation Collection: Aviation pioneer and official. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished finding aid in the repository.
--William Warne Papers, 1930-74, 27 ft., Forms part of the repository's Conservation History and Research Center Collection: Government official (conservation). Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished finding aid in the repository. Information on literary rights available in the repository.

 

State Historical Society of Wisconsin Collections, Madison, Wisconsin:
--William Benton Papers, 1951-61, 5 boxes: Government official and U.S. Senator from Connecticut. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Papers of Carl and Anne Braden, 1935-72, 97 boxes, 7 reels of microfilm and 88 tape recordings: Civil rights activist. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished finding aid in the repository.
--Zona Gale Papers, 1838-1941, Madison, Wisconsin, 18 items, 1 v., and 32 boxes: Author. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Michael Vincent O'Shea Papers, 1892-1932, 23 ft.: Educator. Bulk of the correspondence relates to O'Shea's writings and editorial work. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Inventory in repository.
--Arthur Page Papers, 1908-60, 28 ft.: Public relations and business consultant, of New York. Correspondents include Lou Henry Hoover and Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished inventory in the repository.

 

Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut:
--Alfred Mitchell Bingham Papers, 1920-46, , ca. 12 ft.: Social reformer, lawyer, politician, and founder and editor of the periodical Common Sense. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished register in the library.
--Poppy Cannon Papers, 1945-56, New Haven, Connecticut, ca. 3 ft.: Author. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished register in the library. Access restricted.
--Max Lerner Papers, 1927-69, 42 ft.: Political scientist. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished register in the repository. Information on literary rights available in the repository.
--Harry Weinberger Papers, 1915-42, 25 ft.: Lawyer, of New York. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished register in the library. Information on literary rights available in the library.
--Walter Francis White Papers, 1917-55, ca. 3 ft., Forms part of the library's James Weldon Johnson Memorial Collection: Author and secretary of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, 1929-55. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished register in the library. Access restricted. Information on literary rights available in the library.
--Sir Arthur Willert Papers, 1907-73, 16 ft.: British journalist and diplomat. Includes 45 letters from Eleanor Roosevelt (1932-45). Unpublished register in the repository. Information on literary rights available in the repository.

 

Duke University Library, Durham, North Carolina:
--Lucy Randolph Mason Papers, 1917-54, Durham, North Carolina, 6400 items and 4 v.: Public relations representative in the South for the Congress of Industrial Organizations and resident of Richmond, VA, and Atlanta, GA. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Card index in the library.
--Mary Elizabeth Patten Papers, 1883-1943, 13 v.: Diaries and a scrapbook relating to Miss Patten's activities in Washington, DC, society in the early 20th century, commenting on social functions and local gossip. Includes references to Calvin Coolidge, Warren G. Harding, Herbert Hoover, Eleanor Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt, and William Howard Taft. Card index in the library.

 

Joyner Library, East Carolina University Library, Greenville, North Carolina:
--Waldemar E. Debnam Papers, 1854-1967, ca. 1500 items: Journalist and radio and television commentator. Wrote a book entitled Weep No More, My Lady (1950) which is critical of Eleanor Roosevelt. Finding aid in the repository.
--Cornelia (Petty) Jerman Papers, 1911-67, 53 items: Democratic Party official and assistant collector of internal revenue for North Carolina. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished finding aids in the library.
--John Albert Lang Papers, 1932-1974, 42 ft.: Government official, Air Force Reserve officer, and North Carolina Secretary of Military and Veterans Affairs. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Access restricted in part for records dated 1961-71. Unpublished finding aids in the repository.

 

North Carolina Division of Archives and History, Raleigh, North Carolina:
--Ruth Current Papers, 1926-67, ca. 800 items, Open, Published guide: Current was a local, district, and state home demonstration agent in North Carolina between 1928 and 1958, and from 1958 to 1961 she was assistant director of the North Carolina State University extension service in charge of home economics programs. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Clarence H. Poe Papers, 1860-1963, Ca. 18 cu. ft., Open, Published guide: Collection contains information on funds for salaries of home economics teacher; material of the North Carolina Constitutional Commission, including letters to prominent state women in 1934 seeking support for proposed changes in the state constitution; speeches and articles. Includes letters by Eleanor Roosevelt.
--May (Thompson) Evans Papers, 1871-1975, Raleigh, North Carolina ca. 31 cu. ft., Open, Published guide: A speaker, editor, writer, teacher, administrator, and information officer who held various government and political positions. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Jackson Library,University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, North Carolina:
--Harriet Wiseman Elliott Papers, 1900-1972, , ca. 7 ft.: Professor of political science and dean of women, Woman's College of the University of North Carolina (now University of North Carolina at Greensboro). Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Finding aid in the repository.

 

Hunter Library, Western Carolina University Library, Callowhee, North Carolina:
--Lillian Buchanan Papers, 1920-1966, ca. 1 ft.: Librarian, Western Carolina University. Correspondence, bills and receipts, committee minutes, contracts, photos, and other papers, relating chiefly to Buchanan's establishment of a series of lectures, concerts, and exhibitions called the Lyceum Program at the university, featuring such persons as Margaret Truman and Eleanor Roosevelt. Finding aid in the repository.

 

University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois:
--A Century of Progress International Exposition Records, 1928-40, , 555 ft., Open, Unpublished guide: The Exposition was a world's fair held in Chicago during the summers of 1933 and 1934 in commemoration of the centennial of Chicago's incorporation. Includes items of Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Chicago Council on Foreign Relations Records, 1922-75, Chicago, Illinois, 70 ft., Open, Register: The Council, which was founded in 1922, is an educational organization that gathers to discuss US foreign policy and international relations. Includes speech given at a meeting by Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Frank McCallister Papers, 1923-71, Chicago, Illinois, 20 ft., Open, Unpublished guide: McCallister (1908-70) was a labor organizer and political activist on behalf of civil and human rights. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

University of Chicago Library, Chicago, Illinois:
--Kermit Eby Papers, 1933-62, ca. 14 ft.: Sociologist, educator, labor leader, and minister of the United Brethren Church. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished guide in the library.

 

Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, Illinois:
--Wives of U.S. Presidents Collection, 1840-1948, ca. 143 items, Open, Card catalog: Correspondence and other papers of the wives of American presidents include items of Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Morris Library, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois:
--Elsie Ripley Clapp Papers, 1910-47, 2 cu. ft., Open, Unpublished guide: (Miss) Clapp (1879-1965), a teacher and writer, studied with educator John Dewey from 1907 until 1927. With the help of Eleanor Roosevelt, Clapp became head of the school system in Arthurdale, WV, a resettlement project for unemployed miners.
--Marjorie Lawrence Papers, 1926-1977, Carbondale, Illinois, ca. 105 ft.: Opera singer. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Northwestern University Library, Evanston, Illinois:
--Notable Women Collection, ca. 1886-1962, , Ca. 88 items, Open, Card catalog: Includes correspondence of Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Newberry Library, Chicago, Illinois:
--Carter Henry Harrison, IV, Papers, 1769-1953, 3937 items, Open, Inventory: Harrison (1860-1953) was mayor of Chicago from 1897 to 1905 and from 1911 to 1915. Correspondence relating to civic reform in Chicago is with Eleanor Roosevelt.
--May Walden Kerr Papers, 1890-1958, Chicago, Illinois, 619 items, Open, Inventory: Socialist author and lecturer. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Roosevelt University Archives, Chicago, Illinois:
Roosevelt University Development Office Records, 1945-63, Open, Unpublished guide, 3 ft., Open, Unpublished guide: Correspondence, speeches, news releases, biographical data, programs, and clippings concern persons including Eleanor Roosevelt, who spoke during special events at Roosevelt University.

 

Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, Minnesota:
--Harry Amos Bullis Papers, 1898-1963, ca. 17 ft., 92 v.: Engineer and business executive of Minneapolis. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished inventory in the repository.
--Howard Yolen Williams Papers, 1924-70, 28.75 ft., Open, Unpublished guide: Williams (1889-1973), pastor of a Congregational church in St. Paul, was active in the Farmer-Labor party, the Democratic-Farmer-Labor party, and national political organizations. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Social Welfare History Archives Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota:
--Child Study Association of America Records, 1890-1965, ca. 18 ft. and 1 microfilm reel (negative and positive), In part, microfilm of minute books (1890-1900) of Society for the Study of Child Nature made in 1967 from originals in Child Study Association of America (New York, NY): Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Finding aid in the repository.
--Survey Associates, New York Records, 1891-1952, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 125 ft.: Personal and professional correspondence, corporate and membership records, administrative and financial records, and editorial files of an organization for the advancement of social welfare through research and publication, especially through the Survey magazines. Primary correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished guide in the library. Open to investigators under library restrictions. Information on literary rights available in the library.

 

Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia:
--Homer Stille Cummings Papers, 1886-1956, 171 ft., ca. 24,000 items: Lawyer and mayor of Stanford, Conn., and U.S. Attorney General. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished finding aid in the repository.
--Carter Glass Papers, 1821-1946, 125 ft.: Farmer, newspaper publisher, political leader, and statesman. Professional and personal papers (nearly all dated 1909 and later), including correspondence, speeches, notes and memoranda, documents, printed matter, clippings, and other material. Correspondents include Edith Bolling Wilson and Eleanor Roosevelt. Described in Inventory of the Carter Glass papers at the University of Virginia.
--Edward Reilly Stettinius Papers, 1918-49, Charlottesville, Virginia, 398 ft. (ca. 500,000 items): U.S. Secretary of State. Correspondence and other papers covering the major phases of Stettinius' career. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Information on literary rights available in the library.

 

George C. Marshall Research Foundation Library, Lexington, Virginia:
--George Catlett Marshall Papers, 1932-60, 115 ft.: Army officer, U.S. Secretary of State, and U.S. Secretary of Defense. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. The Papers of George C. Marshall, 1932-1960; A guide, by John N. Jacob, was published by the George C. Marshall Research Foundation (1979).
--Frank McCarthy Papers, 1941-49, Lexington, Virginia, 14 ft.: Army officer, Government official, and motion picture producer. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished register in the repository.

 

Lilly Library, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana:
--Claude Gernade Bowers Papers, ca. 1893-1972, 42 ft., ca. 18,400: Journalist and diplomat. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished finding aids in the repository.

 

Archives of DePauw University and Indiana United Methodism, Greencastle, Indiana:
--Worth Marion Tippy Papers, 1880-1961, ca. 10 ft. (ca. 4100 items): Methodist minister in Indiana, Ohio, and New York City, and executive secretary of the Commission on the Church and Social Service of the Federal Council of Churches of Christ in America. Unpublished register in the repository. Information on literary rights available in the repository.

 

Funderburg Library,Manchester College, North Manchester, Indiana:
--Michael "Mike" Myers Papers, 1924-74, , ca. 900 items, Open, Unpublished guide: Myers (1924-74) acted with stock companies and in Broadway plays. Includes a letter from Dore Schary written about the time Myers played Eleanor Roosevelt in Schary's play Sunrise at Campobello.

 

Amistad Research Center, Tulane University,New Orleans, Louisiana:
--Carol Brice Papers, 1905-, 4 vols. and ca. 4000 items, Open, Unpublished guide: Teacher and vocalist. Brice sang at the White House for Franklin D. Roosevelt's third inauguration at the invitation of Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Julius Rosenwald Fund Records, 1917-48, New Orleans, Louisiana, 140,879 microfilm exposures and 50 microfilm reels, Open, Description and register: Founded by Julius Rosenwald (1862-1932), this Fund was chartered in 1917 with an endowment of $20 million; it sought to equalize opportunities among Americans by supporting Negro education and health programs, fellowships for Negroes and white southerners, and other activities. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Harry Francis Vincent Edward Papers, 1914-74, New Orleans, Louisiana, ca. 4 ft.: Black athlete. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished finding aid in the repository.

 

Center for American History, University of Texas, Austin, Texas:
--Aurelia Dashiell Papers, 1857-1937, ca. 400 items: Resident of San Antonio. Personal correspondence addressed to Miss Dashiell; correspondence of the Dashiell family. Persons mentioned include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished guide in the library.

 

Harry Ransom Center/Humanities Research Center, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas:
--Fannie Hurst Papers, 1927-60, 102 ft., 16 items, Open, Partial unpublished guide: Correspondence, typescripts of novels and articles, a reply to a questionnaire, photos, and clipping of Hurst (1889-1968), a novelist. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

University of Arkansas Library, Fayetteville, Arkansas:
--Glenn Ward Dresbach Papers, 1907-68, 8 ft.: Poet. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Indexes to correspondents and poems and unpublished finding aids in the library. Open to investigators under library restrictions.

 

Alabama Dept. of Archives and History, Montgomery, Alabama:
--Clifford J. Durr Papers, 1933-1975, 22 ft., ca. 10 ft., In part, photocopies of Durr family correspondence in Hugo Black papers, Library of Congress (Washington, DC): Lawyer and government official, of Wetumpka, AL, and Washington, DC. Counsel for New Deal agencies and Rosa Parks. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt and Lady Bird and Lyndon Johnson. Finding aid in the repository.

 

Tuskegee Institute Archives, Tuskegee, Alabama:
--Southern Conference Educational Fund Records, 1938-63, 155 Hollinger boxes, Open, Unpublished guide: Board minutes, correspondence, and photos of the Fund include information about Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library, Abilene, Kansas:
--Dwight D. Eisenhower Pre-Presidential and Presidential Papers, 1953-61,122 ft., Access restricted, Unpublished guide: The Press Conference series contains a reference in 1956 to equal rights for women and others concerning Eleanor Roosevelt's visit to China in 1957. The pre-presidential papers contains correspondence between Eisenhower and Mrs. Roosevelt.
--Mary (Pillsbury) Lord Papers, 1941-72, ca. 1 ft. (ca. 800 items), Chiefly photocopies of originals loaned by Mrs. Lord: Public official (Human Rights Commission of the United States-1953-61). Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt and President and Mrs. Eisenhower. Unpublished finding aid in the repository. Access restricted. Information on literary rights available in the repository.

 

North Dakota Institute for Regional Studies, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota:
--Fargo-Moorhead Open Forum Records, 1936-1967, , ca. 2 ft.: Sponsored lecture series in Fargo, ND, and Moorhead, MN; organized 1930, inactive after 1967. Most correspondence consists of letters to and from speakers, including Eleanor Roosevelt. Finding aid in the repository.
--Thorstina (Jackson) Walters, Emile and Thorstina (Jackson) Walters Papers, 1884-1959, Fargo, North Dakota, ca. 2 ft.: Historian and translator. Mrs. Walters' correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished finding aid in the repository.

 

South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina:
--Wil Lou Gray Papers, 1900-76, , 34,963 items and 403 v.: Educator, of Columbia, SC. Correspondence, newsletters, reports, photos, notebooks, and scrapbooks, relating to adult education. Unpublished finding aid in the repository.

 

Arizona Historical Society, Tucson, Arizona:
--John Campbell and Isabella Greenway Papers, 1860-1936, 100 ft., Open, Published guide and calendar: John Greenway (1872-1926) was a mining engineer and executive who founded the town of Ajo, AZ, and was active in politics, ranching, and real estate. (Mrs.) Isabella Greenway (1886-1953) was a confidante of Eleanor Roosevelt and was the first US Congresswoman from Arizona, serving from 1933 to 1936. Includes 140 letters from Theodore Roosevelt to John Greenway regarding political and personal matters, letters of Mrs Theodore Roosevelt and the Roosevelt children, 40 letters from Eleanor Roosevelt and 10 from Franklin D. Roosevelt.

 

Smathers Library,University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida:
--Alden Hatch Papers, 1930-1973, ca. 25 ft.: Author. Wrote Franklin D. Roosevelt (1947), and Red Carpet for Mamie (1954). Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Maryland Historical Society, Oral History Office, Baltimore, Maryland:
--Adelyn Dohme Breeskin Oral History, 1971-ca. 400 tapes, Open, Unpublished guide: Breeskin, director of the Baltimore Museum of Art from 1947 to 1962 mentions Eleanor Roosevelt.
--Theodore R. McKeldin and Lillie May Jackson Oral History, 1976-77, 98 tapes and 40 transcripts, Open, Unpublished guide: McKeldin was governor of Maryland twice and mayor of Baltimore twice during the period from 1935 to 1970. Jackson (1889-1975), who received an honorary PhD from Morgan State university in Baltimore, was president of the Baltimore chapter of the NAACP and president of the Maryland conference of the NAACP from 1942 to 1962. Jackson's daughter Virginia (Jackson) Kiah speaks of her acquaintance with Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Bailey Library,University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont:
--Bradford Smith Papers, 1926-1975, , 7 ft., In part, photocopies of typescripts: English teacher, St. Paul's University, Tokyo, Japan, Columbia University, New York, NY, and Bennington College, VT, Guggenheim fellow, and director, Bennington International Summer School; b. William Bradford Smith. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Finding aid in the repository and published in National Inventory of Documentary Sources in the United States, microfiche 4.18.153.
--United Stone and Allied Products Workers of America Records, 1889-1970, Burlington, Vermont, 42 ft., In part, microfilm (112 reels) of originals in United Steel Workers of America headquarters and of originals that were destroyed: Correspondence, agreements, reports, financial and strike material, minutes of meetings, clippings, posters, printed matter, and publications by the union and other organizations. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Inventory in the library.

 

Mitchell Memorial Library, Mississippi State University, Starkville, Mississippi:
--Margaret Valiant Papers, 1918-78, 712 items, Open, Unpublished guide: Correspondence and other papers relating to (Mrs.) Valiant's work with the special skills division of the Resettlement Administration and with the music division of the National Youth Administration. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Mississippi Department of Archives and History, Jackson, Mississippi:
--Ellen (Sullivan) Woodward Papers, 1925-61, 32 Hollinger horizontal boxes and 4 oversize ms. boxes, Open, Descriptions: Mississippi legislator, and the only woman member of the wartime Social Security Board. Includes correspondence from President and Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt.

 

Washington State University Library, Pullman, Washington:
--Paul Philemon Kies Papers, 1621-1970, 2 ft., Open, Unpublished guide: Autograph and letter collector. Eleanor Roosevelt is represented.

 

University of Washington Library, Seattle, Washington:
--Anna Louise Strong Papers, 1885-1967, ca. 16 ft.: Journalist, of Seattle, Wash. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished finding aid in the repository. Access restricted. Information on literary rights available in the repository.

 

Nebraska State Historical Society, Lincoln, Nebraska:
--James Earnest Lawrence Papers, 1910-57, ca. 14,000 items: Journalist, of Lincoln, NE. Correspondence, newspaper and press notices, and printed material, relating to Lawrence's political activities in behalf of George W. Norris and Franklin D. Roosevelt, his membership on the Nebraska Advisory Board, and to Federal and State irrigation projects. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Brown University Library, Providence, Rhode Island:
--Willard Maas Papers, 1931-67, ca. 500 items: Poet and teacher at Wagner College, Staten Island, NY. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Complete list of mss. in the library. Information on literary rights available in the library.

 

Mundt Library, Dakota State College, Madison, South Dakota:
--Karl Earl Mundt Papers, 1927-72, 640 ft. (ca. 15,000 items): U.S. Representative and Senator from South Dakota. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt. Unpublished finding aids in the repository.

 

Miller Library, Colby College, Waterville, Maine:
--Eleanor (Roosevelt) Roosevelt Letters, 1928-62, 114 items: Letters from Mrs. Roosevelt to her friend Helene M. Crooks.

 

Penrose Library,University of Denver, Denver, Colorado:
--World Mothers for Peace, Castle Rock, Colo., Unit Records, 1950-71, 2 ft.: Correspondence, charter, bylaws, minute books, fiscal journal, 6 scrapbooks containing letters, programs, greetings, photos, and clippings, items relating to 20 organizations with mutual interests, 2 tape recordings by Victoria Booth-Clibborn Demarest, co-founder of the unit, and other records of an organization affiliated with UNESCO. Unpublished guide in the repository. Permanent deposit by Mrs. Lillian Pine, president, and co-founder, on behalf of the organization.